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Home Care in Toquerville, UT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that's how it should be - a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren't able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today's world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in Toquerville, UT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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Home Care Toquerville, UT

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients' lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a "one size fits all" approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life's little moments - where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can't quite keep up with life's daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in Toquerville, UT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in Toquerville, UT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

 In-Home Care Toquerville, UT

Types of In-home Care in Toquerville, UT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

 Elderly Care Toquerville, UT

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming
 Senior Care Toquerville, UT

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Respite Care Toquerville, UT

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings
 Caregivers Toquerville, UT

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior's daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in Toquerville, UT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

Home Care Toquerville, UT
  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client's individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor's appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior's needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

 In-Home Care Toquerville, UT

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Toquerville, UT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

 Elderly Care Toquerville, UT

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Toquerville, UT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

 Senior Care Toquerville, UT

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran's Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Toquerville,UT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in Toquerville, UT

Woman deemed ineligible after months on Utah housing waiting list

Copy This Embed Code: Ad ST. GEORGE, Utah — The hunt for housing for many Utah families has been increasingly difficult. Amid the topsy-turvy seller’s market and a lack of affordable homes, one Toquerville woman was hopeful when she thought she had landed a perfect spot for her disabled mother.Las Vegas-transplant Kimberly Osborne decided in March that she wanted to move her 74-year-old mother Glenda to Utah, and thought she found an ideal home at Summit Pointe Apartments, a senior living complex in St. Georg...

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ST. GEORGE, Utah — The hunt for housing for many Utah families has been increasingly difficult. Amid the topsy-turvy seller’s market and a lack of affordable homes, one Toquerville woman was hopeful when she thought she had landed a perfect spot for her disabled mother.

Las Vegas-transplant Kimberly Osborne decided in March that she wanted to move her 74-year-old mother Glenda to Utah, and thought she found an ideal home at Summit Pointe Apartments, a senior living complex in St. George.

“I called and the lady told me I can get on the waiting list, and she said it would be about six months,” said Osborne. “She said all you have to do is just keep calling every month to keep her on the list.”

So Osborne called and called until finally, “October 25, she called me and told me, ‘I emailed you this letter, you need to fill it out, sign it and get it back to me before the end of the day.’ So I did,” she said.

But even after climbing to the top of the waiting list, there was still a wait.

“I didn’t hear nothing else," Osborne explained. "November 4, I called and it usually goes to voicemail if nobody answers. Nobody answered. I called back on the 7th and I called a couple times throughout the day.

"I called back on the 9th and the 10th, and then on the 17th of November; I get an email telling me that due to the increase in Social Security that it puts her over the limit and that she is no longer eligible for the apartment.”

Upset after a nearly nine-month delay, Osborne called the St. George Housing Authority, who encouraged her to call 2-1-1, which then prompted her to call the property’s management team.

“I explained to [the apartment complex] what had happened and that I wanted to speak to somebody higher up. They took my information, but nobody ever called," said Osborne. “If they’re doing this to me, then they’re doing this to other people.”

FOX 13 News went to the St. George Housing Authority to get answers, where it was learned that there is no set standard for income limitations as apartment complexes are allowed to set their own income requirements.

“The application is kind of the key component to say look, here’s what we expect to be on our program. If you qualify, we want to work with you,” said Michael Barben, director of the St. George Housing Authority. “Because these income limits change, I don’t want them to lose hope. But often times we can say, ‘Look, we’ll get you back on the waiting list. let’s see with the income limits do next year.'”

That information was passed along to Osborne who, despite the roadblock, is still working to find a home for her mom close to Toqueville.

“I know that I’ll find something and I’ll be able to call her and tell her.”

Copyright 2023 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Helicopter rescue team pressed into service on first day to rescue woman injured at Toquerville Falls

ST. GEORGE — It was the first day of the Utah Department of Public Safety’s new Southern Utah helicopter rescue team, and it only took a few hours for it to prove its worth.They came to assist Friday in the rescue of a woman who was injured while either jumping or falling off a waterfall in a remote, rugged area above Toquerville. A woman shattered her left knee and right ankle after a rough landing in the rocks below Toquerville Falls, and it took a joint effort of Washington County Search and Rescue with...

ST. GEORGE — It was the first day of the Utah Department of Public Safety’s new Southern Utah helicopter rescue team, and it only took a few hours for it to prove its worth.

They came to assist Friday in the rescue of a woman who was injured while either jumping or falling off a waterfall in a remote, rugged area above Toquerville. A woman shattered her left knee and right ankle after a rough landing in the rocks below Toquerville Falls, and it took a joint effort of Washington County Search and Rescue with the Hurricane Valley Fire District to reach the injured party.

But to get her out, it took an additional team that until Friday didn’t exist in Southern Utah.

Until now, the Utah Department of Public Safety’s Aero Bureau would aid in rescues locally by having to fly its helicopter an hour-and-a-half from Salt Lake City. But on Friday, a second team and helicopter went into operation at St. George Airport.

When it became too difficult and painful to the victim to get her out on the ground, Sgt. Darrell Cashin, who oversees Washington County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue team, knew who to call.

“Knowing that the DPS helicopter was here and it was their first day, I figured this would be a good opportunity. They were five hours into it and we said, ‘We need you,’” Cashin said.

Toquerville Falls is considered a hidden treasure of a hike with water from LaVerkin Creek cascading down stepped cliffs,

The area is only reachable by a rough, unpaved road and a short hike. It’s a place without a cell phone signal located 11 miles from the Toquerville Boulevard-Spring Drive turnoff and civilization.

Because of that, a person accompanying the injured woman had to hike at least a mile before getting a signal to call for help, Cashin said.

It’s unclear if the woman had lost her footing on the falls and fell or deliberately jumped, Cashin said. But the result was painful.

The rescuers quickly learned that the initial attempt to drive the injured woman from the scene wasn’t going to work.

“We tried to put her in a vehicle and the pain was too excruciating,” Cashin said, necessitating the need for a short airlift. “The injuries were not life-threatening. It was more of getting her to an ambulance with less discomfort to her.”

After taking off from its new base of St. George Airport, the helicopter found a landing zone near the falls and the woman was brought aboard. She was then flown within minutes to a Toquerville church parking lot where a waiting ambulance took her to St. George Regional Hospital.

Cashin said the Aero Bureau’s new Southern Utah team passed their first test with flying colors.

“We have called on them a lot in the last month but (they) had to fly out of Salt Lake,” Cashin said. “Having them this close with this quick response is really going to enhance our ability.”

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2022, all rights reserved.

Hurricane Valley Fire District proposes ‘significant’ property tax increase

ST. GEORGE — For the second time in recent years, Washington County residents living within the boundaries of the Hurricane Valley Fire District are facing a hefty tax increase.Outlining budgetary stressors such as a rapidly growing population and tourism, increasing call volumes, inflation and other factors, the Hurricane Valley Fire District is proposing a nearly 90% property tax increase. This would help recapture and sustain the funding power of a ...

ST. GEORGE — For the second time in recent years, Washington County residents living within the boundaries of the Hurricane Valley Fire District are facing a hefty tax increase.

Outlining budgetary stressors such as a rapidly growing population and tourism, increasing call volumes, inflation and other factors, the Hurricane Valley Fire District is proposing a nearly 90% property tax increase. This would help recapture and sustain the funding power of a previous tax hike approved in late 2016. Property taxes rose by 74% at the time.

“I don’t want to pay more taxes either,” said Keen Ellsworth, a Toquerville resident who is also the fire district’s business manager. “Problem is, we need the services the district provides.”

Formed in 2007, the Hurricane Valley Fire District has grown to encompass much of eastern Washington County, including Leeds, Toquerville, LaVerkin, Hurricane and the communities up the state Route 9 corridor up to the gates of Zion National Park.

A truth in taxation public hearing for the proposed tax hike is set for Monday, Nov. 21, in LaVerkin.

The tax problem

The 2016 tax increase put the fire district property tax levy at a rate of 0.001408 starting in 2017. However, due to how Utah tax law is set up, that amount gradually dropped each successive year until reaching a rate of 0.000723 for 2022.

Under state law, taxing agencies like the fire district are guaranteed revenue matching the amount set in their previous year’s budget, and they cannot collect any more or any less than that. This means that when the market is doing well, the tax levy will go down since a taxing agency can’t take in more revenue. An exception to this is taxes derived from new construction.

However, the opposite happens when the market slows. Guaranteed the same amount of money as the year before, the amount required by the tax levy remains the same, even while the assessed or taxable value of the property has gone down.

The fire district is proposing to up the tax levy to 0.001589, which translates to an 89.3% increase in property tax for those living within the district’s jurisdiction.

The owner of a property valued at $273,700 based on the current rate will owe $197.89 this year, while the proposed rate will jump that up to $374.70.

“It’s a significant increase, I won’t deny that,” Ellsworth said while continuing to express the need for the increased rate.

‘Increase’: Reasons for the tax increase

According to the fire district’s proposed 2023 budget statement, the current tax rate provides 45% of what would be provided by the 2017 rate.

Since 2017, emergency call volumes have increased by 14.45% annually, while the cost of fire engines has jumped 28%. Insurance costs have also risen by nearly 12%.

In a news post on its website, the fire district also listed some of the more extreme examples of rising expenses. This includes an overall 21% increase in inflation and increasing supply costs since 2017:

“Retaining our 2017 property tax level would have met the needed stability necessitated by growth,” according to the district’s budget statement.

The word “increase” or some variation of it, is evident throughout the budget statement in reference to rising equipment and supply costs, personnel costs, population and tourism that trigger a high level of emergency calls and so on.

“We continue to face multiple challenges presented by expanded growth, diminished proactive staffing time and constantly changing physical resources as we continue to provide service to the citizens of the District,” the proposed budget statement reads. “This budget proposal continues to address our major challenges and is designed to stabilize the District’s level of service and continue striving to reach our ever expanding five-year plan.”

Property taxes make up just less than half of the fire district’s budget, Ellsworth said. Other funding avenues include grants, ambulance transport fees, wildland suppression compensation and operational fees.

The fire district also operates with used and refurbished equipment where possible, the district noted in its proposed budget statement.

Should the new tax rate pass, it will allow the fire district to operate without having to borrow funds, Ellsworth said. Last year the district had to borrow $3.4 million in order to keep operations going at the current level. While the new tax rate will prevent the need for new borrowing, it won’t provide funding to pay off the debt, Ellsworth added.

With funding restored to approximate 2017 levels, the fire district plans to hire additional personnel as well as see to the construction of new fire stations.

Up to 75% of the tax hike will go to paying for fire district personnel and their compensation, while the remaining 25% will go to supplies as well as refurbished and used equipment, Ellsworth said.

“The fire district is being responsible,” he said. “It’s just expensive.”

‘Not justified’ and ‘extreme’

Opposition to the proposed tax increase has been strong from some individuals and municipalities within the fire district.

Jay Crosby, who owns properties within the fire district, said he opposed the 2017 tax hike and felt his objections went unheard. This time he said he hopes to make more of a difference.

“My voice didn’t do any good,” he said. “This isn’t a good time for this. We’re about to go into a recession.”

Crosby’s words echoed concerns over the nation’s present economic state that were cited in a recent St. George City Council meeting when the city proposed to increase property taxes for public safety funding. Fears of a pending recession, continuing inflation and the overall financial strain on everyday residents were considered factors in the measure’s defeat.

Hurricane resident and former mayor John Bramall also voiced his concerns over the matter.

“I support the fire district and the people, but a 90% increase is too much,” he said. “We have to live within our budgets.”

If the fire district were proposing a more moderate increase, like 25% for example, Bramall said he’d have no problem with it. Yet, with a possible economic slowdown on the horizon and construction slowing down, he also said “it’s not a good time.”

During a special open house meeting held in Toquerville on Wednesday, Toquerville Mayor Justin Sip read a letter from himself and the City Council addressed to the Hurricane Fire District’s board outlining their opposition to the tax increase.

“Inflation is currently at a 40-year high and the Federal Reverse has raised interests rates six times in the last year,” Sip read. “In this setting, it is unfortunate that the district has felt it necessary to increase its mill rate so dramatically.”

After reviewing the district’s proposed budget, Sip read that he and the council felt “the proposed increase is not justified and is extreme.”

The letter further states that the residents of Toquerville and other communities under the fire district’s umbrella should not have to “bear the burden” of the tax increase. It also states that concerns about raising the tax levy should have been done incrementally so higher rates would be more manageable and palatable for residents rather than overwhelming.

That was a point addressed in the district’s proposed budget. District officials had planned to hold annual truth in taxation hearings as they proposed gradual increases year-to-year. However, these hearings were continually postponed at the request of Washington County officials, according to the budget statement.

“Holding truth-in-taxation annually was part of the 2017 truth-in-taxation proposal,” the statement reads. “It has been postponed annually at the request of the county … Truth-in-taxation is vital to our continued operations. It is necessary to prevent a decreased level of service created by a staffing stagnation or reduction.”

Toquerville’s mayor and City Council are not the only elected officials opposed to the tax increase as Hurricane Mayor Nanette Billings also said she and her city’s council also stood against it. She and the Hurricane City Council will submit a letter to the district’s board outlining the reasons for their disapproval of the proposal.

“I have carefully analyzed the budget data,” Billings said. “I can not support a tax increase of this magnitude.”

Reasons for Billings’ own misgivings included what she considered to be limited and incomplete information in the fire district’s proposed budget, information on where the money of the tax hike would go not being adequately portrayed to the public and the practice of using one-time money to fund ongoing commitments.

Billings is a member of the fire district’s board, which she described more as an advisory and recommendation-giving body. The true legislative power that approves the board’s recommendations is the Washington County Commission, she said.

“We’re requesting the commission deny this proposal,” Billings said.

Public hearing details

A public hearing will be held at the LaVerkin City Council Chambers at 111 S. Main St. in LaVarkin at 6:01 p.m., Monday, Nov. 21.

If you desire to speak at the hearing, you will need to email the Fire District at [email protected] by noon on Monday.

Additional information can be found on the Hurricane Valley Fire District website.

The tax increase is a part of the fire district’s proposed 2023 budget. If approved by the fire district’s board, it then goes to the Washington County Commission for final approval or denial.

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2022, all rights reserved.

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Utah experiences another interesting day of weather

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah experienced another interesting day of weather on Wednesday.According to the National Weather Service out of Salt Lake City (NWS), Utah’s capital set a record for the second-straight day. On Wednesday, Salt Lake City reached the 100-degree mark for the 23rd time this summer.Salt Lake City also reached triple-digits on Tuesday for the 22nd time this summer, which broke the previous record of 21 times. The old record of 21 times had been set during three previous summers, including last year....

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah experienced another interesting day of weather on Wednesday.

According to the National Weather Service out of Salt Lake City (NWS), Utah’s capital set a record for the second-straight day. On Wednesday, Salt Lake City reached the 100-degree mark for the 23rd time this summer.

Salt Lake City also reached triple-digits on Tuesday for the 22nd time this summer, which broke the previous record of 21 times. The old record of 21 times had been set during three previous summers, including last year.

We have officially hit triple digits for the 23rd time this year, extending our record breaking streak for most triple digit days in a given year for KSLC (previous record: 21 days). #utwx

— NWS Salt Lake City (@NWSSaltLakeCity) August 17, 2022

More interesting weather

While the northern end of the state was dealing with the warm temperatures, various parts of southern Utah were dealing with another day of flash flooding.

According to the NWS, the areas in and around Hilldale and Colorado City experienced flash flooding from the Short Creek. The flash flood warning in the area was in effect until 8 p.m. Wednesday.

Flash flooding is ongoing in Hildale and Colorado City at this time. Water from Short Creek is spilling onto some area roadways at this time. Find higher ground immediately! #utwx https://t.co/3SK7ZJXPP2

— NWS Salt Lake City (@NWSSaltLakeCity) August 18, 2022

The NWS also issued a flash flood warning for the town of Veyo and the surrounding area. It was reported to the NWS that water was on the roads in poor drainage areas.

Earlier Wednesday, the NWS issued a special weather statement for La Verkin, Toquerville and Virgin due to the likelihood of wind gusts of up to 50 miles per hour.

Another flash flood warning was issued for the eastern portion of Zion National Park, including the Narrows. However, that warning expired at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday.

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Flash flood warning issued for Southern Utah, including Zion National Park

ST. GEORGE — The National Weather Service in Salt Lake City has issued a flash flood warning for Southern Utah, including Washington and Kane counties. A flood advisory also has been issued for cities throughout Washington County.A flash flood warning was issued early Monday morning for west central Kane County and east central Washington County in effect Monday from 5:25 a.m. through 10:30 a.m. The Doppler radar indicate...

ST. GEORGE — The National Weather Service in Salt Lake City has issued a flash flood warning for Southern Utah, including Washington and Kane counties. A flood advisory also has been issued for cities throughout Washington County.

A flash flood warning was issued early Monday morning for west central Kane County and east central Washington County in effect Monday from 5:25 a.m. through 10:30 a.m. The Doppler radar indicated thunderstorms producing heavy rain across the warned area where flash flooding is ongoing and expected.

The weather service has forecasted life-threatening flash flooding from thunderstorms, as well as life-threatening flash flooding of normally dry washes, slot canyons and small streams. Some locations expected to experience flash flooding, according to the weather service, include Zion National Park, Behunin Canyon, Echo Canyon, Keyhole, Pine, Spry Canyons and The Narrows.

The weather service issued a flood advisory just after 7 a.m. that includes Washington City, Hurricane, LaVerkin, Quail Creek State Park, Sand Hollow State Park, Toquerville, Leeds, Virgin and Pintura. The advisory is in effect until 9 a.m.

You should monitor later forecasts and be alert for possible flood warnings. Those living in areas prone to flooding should be prepared to take action should flooding develop.

Updated 7:13 a.m. Monday, to include flood advisory.

Precautions

Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation. The public should monitor the latest forecasts and be prepared to take action.

Turn around. Don’t drown.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association and the National Weather Service offer the following safety rules for flash flooding:

During any flood emergency, stay tuned to official weather reports via radio, television and social media. Cell phone users can also sign up to receive weather alerts as text messages. You can also follow St. George News and Cedar City News for weather alerts and updates relevant to Southern Utah.

For the most current conditions, warnings and advisories, go to the National Weather Service-Salt Lake City office website.

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