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Home Care in Gunlock, UT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that's how it should be - a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren't able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today's world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in Gunlock, UT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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Home Care Gunlock, UT

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients' lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a "one size fits all" approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life's little moments - where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can't quite keep up with life's daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in Gunlock, UT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in Gunlock, UT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

 In-Home Care Gunlock, UT

Types of In-home Care in Gunlock, UT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

 Elderly Care Gunlock, UT

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming
 Senior Care Gunlock, UT

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Respite Care Gunlock, UT

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings
 Caregivers Gunlock, UT

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior's daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in Gunlock, UT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

Home Care Gunlock, UT
  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client's individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor's appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior's needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

 In-Home Care Gunlock, UT

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Gunlock, UT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

 Elderly Care Gunlock, UT

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Gunlock, UT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

 Senior Care Gunlock, UT

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran's Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Gunlock,UT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in Gunlock, UT

Firing of firefighters creates new flames in dispute between Ivins and Santa Clara

IVINS — City Council members in Ivins said they have been angered by the firing of volunteer firefighters from the Santa Clara-Ivins Fire Department. The move was the latest in the dispute between Ivins and Santa Clara over their joint fire department.Both sides will have a chance to hammer out their differences in a public forum, as the two cities’ first joint City Council meeting has been set for Aug. 3.The chief of the fire department that is overseen by Santa Clara officials with additional fund...

IVINS — City Council members in Ivins said they have been angered by the firing of volunteer firefighters from the Santa Clara-Ivins Fire Department. The move was the latest in the dispute between Ivins and Santa Clara over their joint fire department.

Both sides will have a chance to hammer out their differences in a public forum, as the two cities’ first joint City Council meeting has been set for Aug. 3.

The chief of the fire department that is overseen by Santa Clara officials with additional funding from Ivins said the removals were because either the firefighters hadn’t been working many shifts or weren’t properly trained.

The dispute began in May when the Ivins Council voiced its concern that in late 2021, the department began to leave the Center Street Fire Station unmanned, basing all of the two cities’ firefighters and emergency medical services workers based in Santa Clara at the Rachel Drive station.

On June 16, the Ivins Council authorized $500,000 in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) to fully man the Center Street station and an additional $50,000 on July 7 to improve the station’s alert system. Yet, with the exception of temporary staffing for the July Fourth and Pioneer Day holidays, Center Street remains unmanned.

“Now they fire volunteers that could have helped us a lot at Center Street so it’s ridiculous. We’re just mad,” Ivins Council member Mike Scott said during the council’s July 21 meeting. “We paved the way six weeks ago to staff Center Street except they’ve reduced the number of volunteers. We stepped up to the plate but Santa Clara is in control of making it happen and they’re not doing anything.”

At the close of the council’s meeting Thursday as council members were making reports, council member Dennis Mehr revealed he had been told that six or seven volunteers of the department were fired. Volunteers are not full-time employees of the department and get either part-time pay or no pay at all and usually work a day job.

Mehr mentioned one volunteer let go he said had worked for the department for 19 years, first in Ivins and stayed on after Ivins and Santa Clara merged their departments in 2018.

“She’s missed three days, two because of COVID. She got a call last night from the battalion chief terminating her employment,” Mehr said. “That is not OK. Even if so, you don’t call someone on the phone and terminate them at 8:03 p.m. That is not OK.”

Andrew Parker, the chief of the Santa Clara-Ivins Fire Department, told St. George News that Mehr’s assertion that “six or seven” volunteers had been terminated was incorrect. He said the department has let go of three volunteers, but added two more at the same time for a net loss of one.

“We had three people part-time who we let go,” Parker said. “Two hadn’t worked a shift in two to three months. The third we let go because that person wasn’t’ firefighter or EMS trained.”

Parker said for insurance purposes – the department is required to carry life insurance even for volunteer firefighters – volunteers are required to work at least two shifts a month. He added the department also faces insurance liability for volunteers who aren’t trained, on top of the safety of those volunteers and the people they are trying to protect.

Ivins Council member Jenny Johnson and Lance Anderson have both been volunteer Ivins firefighters in the past. At the council’s July 7 meeting, both expressed concern that the department was shifting away from volunteers. Both sought and got reassurance from Parker, who attended the meeting, that the department would continue to include volunteers in their mix.

At Thursday’s council meeting, Anderson said he understands the need to bring in more full-time firefighters but said volunteers were still needed.

“We do need some full-time people, but when you get a few more people to help you it makes a difference,” Anderson said.

Parker said ultimately, his goal is to make the department more able to respond effectively to fires and emergencies with fully-trained teams. While he said volunteers will be a part of that, his goal has been to move the department away from a majority-volunteer model to a majority full-time model.

“Full-time is just more reliable. It’s just that simple,” Parker said. “They’re going to come to their shift.”

Mehr also took issue with what he said was a new directive from Parker that volunteer firefighters must not respond to fires and incidents directly from their homes or they will be terminated.

“That makes no sense to me,” Mehr said.

Parker confirmed the new policy and said the move has to do with making sure the firefighters have the proper gear and vehicles when they respond. Volunteer firefighters in Ivins are required now to go to the Center Street station first to get into gear and use fire vehicles to respond. Parker added that any minutes that are lost is not as detrimental as having firefighters arrive without gear and taking up the road with their vehicles when firetrucks with hoses and equipment need to get in.

“That’s just for safety,” Parker said. “We want them to be in a fire department vehicle, not speeding in a personal vehicle.”

That’s also a reason why Parker said any volunteer staying on or joining up needs to be fully trained and that a coordinated response is key to effective firefighting.

“When they show up, they need to be coordinated and not going willy-nilly on the fire,” Parker said. “They need to work with the incident commander.”

Ivins Mayor Chris Hart said after an initial meeting with Santa Clara Mayor Rick Rosenberg and county officials on getting the budget and operational go-ahead from Santa Clara for the Center Street reactivation, he has heard nothing further from Santa Clara officials and the Santa Clara Council has yet to have reactivating Center Street on their agenda.

Rosenberg had previously told St. George News the fire department issues would wait for the joint meeting.

The two councils will meet at Santa Clara Town Hall on Aug. 3 at 5 p.m.

“It’s going to be an extremely important meeting,” Hart said. “We need to talk frankly about a number of things.”

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2022, all rights reserved.

Heavy rain causes temporary closure of Old Dixie Highway 91

ST. GEORGE — A large thunderstorm stalled above the west side of Gunlock Reservoir Monday night, dumping water into the Santa Clara River, causing the closure of Old Dixie Highway 91 for a few hours and flooding near the reservoir, according to Washington County officials.Jason Whipple, Washington County Emergency Services Director, estimates the water flow was 1,000 cubic feet per second. Officers were watching Old Dixie Highway 91 at mile marker 18 where it had a surge at the Santa Clara river.In additi...

ST. GEORGE — A large thunderstorm stalled above the west side of Gunlock Reservoir Monday night, dumping water into the Santa Clara River, causing the closure of Old Dixie Highway 91 for a few hours and flooding near the reservoir, according to Washington County officials.

Jason Whipple, Washington County Emergency Services Director, estimates the water flow was 1,000 cubic feet per second. Officers were watching Old Dixie Highway 91 at mile marker 18 where it had a surge at the Santa Clara river.

In addition to water, mud and rocks flooded the highway and closed the road from 7:30-11:30 p.m. while road crews cleaned up the debris. He added that the water flow on the highway extended nearly down to the state line to Nevada.

“So there was a lot of water. And there’s a lot of concern just because you know some things happened in the past with flooding,” Whipple said. “We had water that got up on the road between where Highway 91 and Gunlock Reservoir is. So on that road where it gets close to the river, there was water that came up on the road for a brief period of time and that receded pretty quickly.”

Whipple said that the Manganese Wash Road Bridge crosses the Santa Clara River had water that came up to it and flowed around it and took out some of the edges of the road but it was still passable. There were reports of parts of the Motoqua Road being washed out past the cattle guard and Whipple said they will be checking on the area further.

“After 2005 and 2010, when we had the big floods that devastated houses and caused some havoc, people are really sensitive to these rivers getting up and flooding,” Whipple said. “And you get that little bit of urgency responding to these things. We try to get on top of it quickly. But a lot of times, it ends up being just a normal kind of flooding in a river stuff that we’ve had for years. So it’s good that we want to keep an eye on it and make sure nothing happens. Some of the mitigation work done after 2005 and 2010 has started to pay off.”

Responding agencies included Washington Emergency Services, Washington County Public Works, Enterprise Fire Department, Gunlock Fire and Santa Clara- Ivins Fire Department. The St. George Fire Department also responded to keep an eye on if the flood waters were going to reach the Green Valley area, which Whipple said did not.

St. George Fire Chief said they like being proactive in potential flooding situations. They also want to monitor what is happening with all area agencies so they can be prepared. Stoker reminded the public that they need to keep their distance in an emergency. Stoker said roads might look safe to stand on, but the ground underneath it may be washed away.

The Santa Clara-Ivins Fire and Rescue Management Officer Lance Haynie said his department had crews staged in the area in preparation for potential damages.

“Luckily, the night proved to be uneventful for our cities,” Haynie said.

Additionally, according to a post on the Gunlock State Park Facebook page:

Another storm rolled through last night and dumped on us again. Not much flood damage but it did bring debris into the lake. Boaters be cautious and as always look out for things in the water. We will keep working on keeping the boat ramp clear.

Photo gallery

Copyright St. George News, SaintGeorgeUtah.com LLC, 2022, all rights reserved.

La Niña, rising global temperatures lead forecasters to predict a warm, dry winter for Utah

Climate change, higher overall temperatures and expectations for an unusual third consecutive year with La Niña conditions could all combine to bring another warm, dry winter to southern Utah and the rest of the American West.Lake Powell, Lake Mead and the Great Salt Lake are all at historic lows after years of drought and increased use by growing human populations, and none are expected to get much relief this winter, according to new long-range federal forecasts.The models suggest higher-than-average tem...

Climate change, higher overall temperatures and expectations for an unusual third consecutive year with La Niña conditions could all combine to bring another warm, dry winter to southern Utah and the rest of the American West.

Lake Powell, Lake Mead and the Great Salt Lake are all at historic lows after years of drought and increased use by growing human populations, and none are expected to get much relief this winter, according to new long-range federal forecasts.

The models suggest higher-than-average temperatures and lower-than-average precipitation across the entire region this year, according to a slate of scientists who presented in a meeting Tuesday hosted by multiple government agencies, including the National Integrated Drought Information System.

"Even though uncertainty abounds with these regional forecasts, long-term I would (expect) it to trend like this," said Peter Goble, a climatologist and Water Availability Specialist with the Colorado Climate Center. "Sorry to be the bearer of bad news."

About 94% of the entire Intermountain West region was abnormally dry for this time of year, despite a heavy monsoon rain season that had doused places like southwestern Utah with sometimes heavy rainstorms for much of the last two months. Regionwide, 68% of the area was technically under drought conditions, as defined by federal agencies.

Utah forecast

Southwestern Utah sits right in the middle of a large zone across the West that models show is likely to have a warm, dry winter season,

Another dry winter would only exacerbate the crisis-level efforts to protect the West's major water sources. Powell and Mead were only 34% full compared to their historic 1981-2020 averages and they were expected to drop further over the next year.

"We've been at a record low since about mid-April of last year," Goble said.

Farther north at Great Salt Lake, the lake reached a record-low 4,189 feet as of the latest measurement, about six feet lower than it was just two years ago.

Christine Rumsey, a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Water Science Center, said the state had seen a large-scale cooperative effort from both government agencies and outside groups to try and find solutions, but in the short-term there was little hope of seeing the lake rise much over the next year.

"We expect the lake to keep dropping and hit a new historic low in the fall, probably in October or November," she said.

La Niña 'triple dip'

Meteorologists say that for the third straight year, La Niña will persist throughout the winter in the Northern Hemisphere. This is the first "triple dip" La Niña of the century, according to an update from the United Nations' World Meteorological Organization.

This La Niña began in September 2020.

The La Niña climate pattern is a natural cycle marked by cooler-than-average ocean water in the central Pacific Ocean. It is one of the main drivers of weather in the United States and around the world, especially during late fall, winter and early spring.

It's the opposite to the more well-known El Niño, which occurs when water in the Pacific Ocean is warmer than average.

A typical La Niña winter in the U.S. brings cold and snow to the Northwest and unusually dry conditions to most of the nation's southern tier, according to NOAA's Climate Prediction Center. The Southeast and mid-Atlantic also tend to see warmer-than-average temperatures during a La Niña winter.

David DeMille writes about southwestern Utah for The Spectrum & Daily News, a USA TODAY Network newsroom based in St. George. Follow him at @SpectrumDeMille or contact him at [email protected]. To support and sustain this work, please subscribe today.

Explore the State Parks in Southern Utah

Known as the University of the Parks, Southern Utah University soars when it comes to outdoor adventure opportunities. The University is within a five-hour drive of more than 20 national parks and monuments in Utah, Arizona, and Nevada, and has seven Utah state parks within an hour of campus. These seven state parks in southern Utah offer camping, hiking, horseback riding, boating and so much more. So, the next time you are looking for a close-by and affordable adventur...

Known as the University of the Parks, Southern Utah University soars when it comes to outdoor adventure opportunities. The University is within a five-hour drive of more than 20 national parks and monuments in Utah, Arizona, and Nevada, and has seven Utah state parks within an hour of campus. These seven state parks in southern Utah offer camping, hiking, horseback riding, boating and so much more. So, the next time you are looking for a close-by and affordable adventure, check out one of these southern Utah state parks.

7 State Parks in Southern Utah

1 mile from campus, a 3-minute driveEntrance fee: $4 per person

Step back in time and learn about the history and development of Iron County at the Frontier Homestead State Park Museum. Museum displays include horse-drawn vehicles used from 1850 to 1920, a collection of pioneer artifacts, and the only known remaining artifact from the original iron foundry – the town bell.

In addition to the permanent collections, changing special exhibits highlight artists from the local region, as well as rarely seen artifacts from the museum’s collections. Other items of interest include several historic cabins, a large collection of horse-drawn farm equipment, and Cedar City’s oldest remaining brick home, the Hunter House.

62 miles from campus, a 55-minute driveDay use fee: $10 per vehicle for up to 8 people

This scenic park is home to ancient lava flows, red Navajo sandstone, and a diversity of plant and wildlife species seen nowhere else in the state. Outdoor enthusiasts from all over appreciate the sandstone cliffs and the wide variety of activities available. Whether you enjoy camping, hiking, photography, nature studies, wildlife viewing, or canyoneering, Snow Canyon has you covered. With almost 40 miles of hiking trails, including a paved three-mile trail, and 15 miles of equestrian trails, this place is an explorer’s dream! Visitors enjoy seeing lizards, foxes, quail, falcons, and even frogs while taking in the history of the area that was inhabited thousands of years ago.

78 miles from campus, 1 hour and a 30-minute driveDay use fee: $10 per vehicle

Open year-round and with nearly 4,000 acres, this park provides abundant opportunities for outdoor adventure. Camp, hike, photograph, watch wildlife, horseback ride, or take an ATV for a spin in this blissful desert playground. Temperatures are generally mild, but it is best to visit from March - October. As if you need more reason to visit, they also allow pets providing you have your companion on a leash. While you’re there, take advantage of the picnic and RV sites and make it a fun-filled weekend getaway.

71 miles from campus, 1 hour and 15-minute driveDay use fee: $10

Located northwest of St. George, Utah, you’ll find the chance to boat, fish, camp, swim, kayak, and more! The red rock surroundings create a stunning landscape that keeps visitors stopping by year-round. Feel free to have fun with your favorite water sports and then rest on the beach or at one of the designated picnic areas. You can also spend your time with some quality fishing by catching catfish and bass. No matter the reason you visit, we’re positive this is one place you need to check out.

96 miles from campus, a 2-hour driveDay use fee: $10 per vehicle

Named by the National Geographic Society, the red rock sandstone spires surround a superb area to camp, hike, mountain bike, horseback ride, and more. Just 10 miles southeast of Kodachrome Basin State Park, you’ll find the double-arched Grosvenor Arch. Let your imagination and inspiration take flight by the beautiful sights of the sandstone layers that reveal 180 million years of geologic time.

Change up your surroundings and add warm blue water surrounded by red sandstone at this 20,000-acre park! This popular location is a dream for anyone longing to boat, fish, ride ATVs, camp, picnic, or spend an afternoon on the beach. You’ll find an endless supply of adventure and fun less than an hour away from campus, perfect for a quick getaway with anyone you choose.

Want to take your blue water adventure up a notch? Sand Hollow’s rental shop includes ATVs, UTVs, kayaks, paddle boards, and more. A dive shop is also available that provides equipment and instruction for scuba diving and snorkeling at the reservoir where under the water divers will find an old school bus and a plane.

41 miles from campus, a 40-minute driveDay use fee: $15 per vehicle for up to 8 people

Searching for some warm waters within our desert landscape? Quail Creek is the spot if you want to boat, camp, hike, fish, or volunteer. Two dams form this reservoir full of trout, catfish, and bass. It’s a popular location year-round due to its ideal temperatures. If you're looking for a chance to help out, it checks off two items on your list – adventure and volunteering. You can help out the reservoir for a few hours, a day, or even a year. Kayak, paddleboards, PWCs, and more are available for rent making it an ideal adventure spot for everyone.

Having fun on a student budget can be tricky. If you are looking to save money while enjoying Utah’s State Parks, you may want to consider purchasing an annual pass. For about $100, the annual pass covers day use entrance fees at Utah State Parks and is good for 12 months from the date of purchase. Typically the entrance fee is per vehicle, so this annual pass also covers any friends or family you bring along.

No matter which state parks in southern Utah you choose to visit, you’ll be surrounded by natural beauty and abundant opportunities for outdoor activities. As the University of the Parks, SUU encourages you to get outside and explore! If you’re looking for a way to rent some gear for your next adventure, be sure to check out SUU Outdoors to help you out. Whether the plan is to camp, hike, bike, or be on the water, they’ve got you covered.

A wet winter has made ‘very impressive’ waterfalls at this Utah state park for first time in years

(Photo courtesy of Utah State Parks) Residents in southwest Utah are watching rivers and creeks, hoping they don’t create floods. But at Gunlock State Park, they are smiling at the flows. The wet winter has created “very impressive” waterfalls at Gunlock State Park, according to a post on Facebook by Utah State Parks. The waterfalls occur most springs when Gunlock Reservoir overflows, but the photos posted on social media show especially strong flows over multiple red rock ledges.Residents in southwest Utah are watch...

(Photo courtesy of Utah State Parks) Residents in southwest Utah are watching rivers and creeks, hoping they don’t create floods. But at Gunlock State Park, they are smiling at the flows. The wet winter has created “very impressive” waterfalls at Gunlock State Park, according to a post on Facebook by Utah State Parks. The waterfalls occur most springs when Gunlock Reservoir overflows, but the photos posted on social media show especially strong flows over multiple red rock ledges.

Residents in southwest Utah are watching rivers and creeks, hoping they don’t create floods. But at Gunlock State Park, they are smiling at the flows.

The wet winter has created “very impressive” waterfalls at Gunlock State Park, according to a post on Facebook by Utah State Parks. The waterfalls occur many springs when Gunlock Reservoir overflows, but the photos posted on social media show especially strong flows over multiple red rock ledges.

It's happening! The waterfalls at Gunlock State Park are currently active. This is a rare event and worth visiting. Please remember to bring your Utah State Parks pass or pay the appropriate day-use fee at the entrance. Have fun and be cautious around ledges and swift water. pic.twitter.com/Xw9UKyWB9S

— Utah State Parks (@UtahStateParks) March 7, 2019

Jon Allred, the park manager, estimated it was the first time in seven years the flows were much more than a trickle over the side of the spillway.

“It’s not natural," Allred said, "but over the years, since the reservoir has been made, it has kind of carved its own way, and now it’s quite a show.”

The waterfalls, Allred said, might only last a few weeks — until precipitation dissipates and irrigation users begin drawing from Gunlock Reservoir.

Visitors can walk up to the falls, Allred said. Walk-ins must pay $2 per person to enter the park. If you’re driving, it’s $10 per car, or $5 for senior drivers. Utah State Parks is warning visitors to be careful around the ledges and flows.

Gunlock State Park is 19 miles northwest of St. George.

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