Supercharging the Value of Low-Impact Exercise with Always Best Senior Services


Today’s post breaks down the ways that Always Best senior services enhances the value of low-impact exercise for aging people in Katy, Texas. Read on to learn about the “no risk, all reward” approach, and find out how to book a free consultation with our team below.

Improve Physical Health and Longevity With Always Best Senior Services

It’s common knowledge that exercise extends life expectancy and reduces morbidity in aging people, but that’s only scratching the surface. With the help of Always Best senior services, a light, functional exercise program focused on walking can combat a number of common issues facing elderly populations in Katy, Texas.

For example, we know for a fact that light exercise programs can reduce the risk of slip-and-fall injuries. One study by the British Medical Journal recruited women 80 years and older to test whether the implementation of light physical therapy and exercise programs reduced the risks of falls. After one year, researchers determined that “exercises improved physical function” and were “effective in reducing falls and injuries in women 80 years and older” (Campbell et al., 1997, p. 1065).

Light exercise also fights sarcopenia, which is the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, which reduces force generation and mobility in the elderly (Zampieri et al., 2016).

Access the Dementia-Fighting Benefits of Light Exercise With Always Best Senior Services

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, there are currently more than 380,000 Texans living with Alzheimer’s disease, and over 1,380,000 family and friends providing care.

Like many chronic illnesses, the incidence of dementia increases with age. But that doesn’t mean there’s nothing we can do to slow its progress and improve quality of life along the way.

Low-impact exercise focusing on functional fitness, such as walking, has been associated with statistically significant reductions in levels of dependence and disability in older adults. This is partly explained by a growing body of research suggesting that some risk factors for heart disease and stroke are associated with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

One study by the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation explored the effects of exercise training on elderly persons with cognitive impairment and dementia. Their meta-analysis included more than 30 trials involving over 2000 subjects from 1970 to 2003. Researchers concluded that functional low-impact exercise increases “fitness, physical function, cognitive function, and positive behavior in people with dementia and related cognitive impairments” (Heyn et al., 2004, p. 1694).

In the same study, Heyn et al. (2004) note that “nursing homes and most institutional settings generally lack proper environmental stimulation and physical activity opportunities” (p. 1694-1695).

So what’s the solution? Dementia sufferers obviously require some form of long-term care, but being “institutionalized” in traditional nursing homes limits exercise opportunities.

Always Best senior services can bring you the best of both world, giving your loved one the care and supervision they need, while also creating natural opportunities for light, functional exercise. Always Best senior services may include assistance with walking, escorting your loved one on errands, shopping trips, and appointments, and more. In this way, Always Best senior services provide many of the benefits of long-term care, without any of the risks of institutionalization.

Always Best Senior Services in Katy, Texas

Learn more about how Always Best senior services can support your loved one’s healthy aging in Katy, Texas by visiting https://www.alwaysbestcare.com/tx/katy/care-services/in-home-care/.

References

Campbell, A. J., Robertson, M. C., Gardner, M. M., Norton, R. N., Tilyard, M. W., & Buchner, D. M. (1997). Randomised controlled trial of a general practice programme of home based exercise to prevent falls in elderly women. British Medical Journal, 315(7115), 1065-1069.

Heyn, P., Abreu, B. C., &Ottenbacher, K. J. (2004). The effects of exercise training on elderly persons with cognitive impairment and dementia: A meta-analysis1. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 85(10), 1694-1704.

Zampieri, S., Mosole, S., Löfler, S., Fruhmann, H., Burggraf, S., Cvečka, J., &Mayr, W. (2015). Physical exercise in aging: nine weeks of leg press or electrical stimulation training in 70 years old sedentary elderly people. European journal of translational myology, 25(4), 237.

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