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Home Care in South Glastonbury, CT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that's how it should be - a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren't able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today's world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in South Glastonbury, CT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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Home Care South Glastonbury, CT

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients' lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a "one size fits all" approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life's little moments - where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can't quite keep up with life's daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in South Glastonbury, CT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in South Glastonbury, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

 In-Home Care South Glastonbury, CT

Types of In-home Care in South Glastonbury, CT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

 Elderly Care South Glastonbury, CT

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming
 Senior Care South Glastonbury, CT

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Respite Care South Glastonbury, CT

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings
 Caregivers South Glastonbury, CT

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior's daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in South Glastonbury, CT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

Home Care South Glastonbury, CT
  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client's individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor's appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior's needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

 In-Home Care South Glastonbury, CT

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in South Glastonbury, CT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

 Elderly Care South Glastonbury, CT

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in South Glastonbury, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

 Senior Care South Glastonbury, CT

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran's Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in South Glastonbury,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in South Glastonbury, CT

Guide: Where to go apple picking in Connecticut

Looking to go apple picking this fall season? Check out some of the locations in Connecticut. Please check with the location before heading out as dates and times are subject to change.*Note: Locations may have adjusted hours and COVID-19 safety requirements and guidelines.Beardsley's Cider Mill & Orchard278 Leavenworth Road, Route 110Shelton(203) 926-1098WebsiteHours: Begins Sept. 10 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., only...

Looking to go apple picking this fall season? Check out some of the locations in Connecticut. Please check with the location before heading out as dates and times are subject to change.

*Note: Locations may have adjusted hours and COVID-19 safety requirements and guidelines.

Beardsley's Cider Mill & Orchard278 Leavenworth Road, Route 110Shelton(203) 926-1098WebsiteHours: Begins Sept. 10 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., only weekends.

Belltown Hill Orchards483 Matson Hill RoadSouth Glastonbury, CT 06073(860) 633-2789WebsiteHours: Saturday – Sunday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Mid-August – Early NovemberTypes of apples: Paula Red, Ginger Gold, McIntosh, Cortland, Empire, Gala, Stayman and Granny Smith.

Blue Jay Orchards125 Plumtrees RoadBethel, CT 06801(203) 748-0119WebsiteHours: Begins Sept. 4; Tuesdays-Saturdays from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Open Labor Day and Columbus Day

Buell’s Orchard108 Crystal Pond RoadEastford, CT 06242(860) 974-1150More InformationHours: Monday - 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Tuesday-Friday - 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday - 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Other activities: Annual Harvest Festival is Oct. 8 and Oct. 10. There will be live music, hayrides, barbecue, apple cider and donut sampling.

Clark Farms at Bushy Hill Orchard29 Bushy Hill RoadGransby(860) 653-4022WebsiteHours: Starts Sept. 3; Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

DeFazio Orchard1393 North RoadDayville(860) 774-3799WebsiteHours: You Pick is TBD; Farm stand open daily, 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Sundays close at 4:30 p.m.

Dondero Orchards529 Woodland St.South Glastonbury(860) 659-0294WebsiteHours: Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. every day except Tuesday

Easy Pickin’s Orchard46 Bailey RoadEnfield(860) 763-3276WebsiteHours: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Tuesday & Thursday: 4 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.; Open Labor Day and Columbus Day from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.Types of apples: Braeburn, Ginger Gold, Mutsu. Cortland, Empire, Liberty, Red Delicious, Gala, FujiOther activities: Wagon rides, make-your-own scarecrow

Hickory Hills Orchards351 South Meriden Road, Route 70Cheshire(203) 272-3824WebsiteHours: Only open two weekends - Sept. 17 & 18, Sept. 24 & 25

Holmberg Orchards and Winery12 Orchard LaneGales Ferry(860) 464-7305WebsiteHours: Starting Sept. 3 - open Tuesday-Sunday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Open Columbus DayOther activities: Wine tasting, wine maze

Lapsley Orchard403 Orchard Hill RoadPomfret Center(860) 928-9186WebsiteHours: Begins Sept. 1: daily, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.Other activities: Wagon rides, educational programs, marketplace

Lyman Orchards105 South St.Middlefield, CT(860) 349-6015WebsiteHours: Monday-Sunday from 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.Other activities: Corn maze, golf

March Farm160 Munger LaneBethlehem(203) 266-7721WebsiteHours: Pick Your Own begins Sept. 16 at the farm stand and Sept. 24 at the Hilltop; Hilltop picking is open Saturdays & Sundays from 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. until Oct. 30 or when apples run out. Types of apples: Cortland, Empire, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Honey Crisp, Jonagold, McIntosh, Macoun, Red Delicious, RomeOther activities: Corn maze, hayrides, marketplace

Rogers Orchards Shuttle Meadow Farm336 Long Bottom RoadSouthington(860) 229-4240More InformationHours: Friday-Sunday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. through mid-OctoberTypes of apples: Jersey Mac, Ginger Gold, Gala, Macoun, Empire, Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Fuji, Granny Smith, Rome

Scott’s Yankee Farmer291 North Bride Brook RoadEast Lyme(860) 739-5209WebsiteHours: Beginning Sept 3-Oct. 30; Weekends & holidays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Weekdays from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tickets recommended on weekends and holidays. Click here for more info.

Silverman’s Farm451 Sport Hill RoadEaston(203) 261-3306WebsiteHours: Daily, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.Types of apples: Ginger Gold, Gala, Empire, Cortland, Macoun, Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Jonagold, Cameo, Red Rome, Enterprise, Red Winesap

Whittle’s Willow Spring Farm1030 Noank Ledyard RoadMystic(860) 536-3083WebsiteHours: Daily, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Woodstock Orchards494 Route 169Woodstock(860) 928-2225WebsiteHours: Sept. 7-Mid-October; daily 9 a.m.-6 p.m.Types of apples: Mcintosh, Cortland, Empire, Macoun, Jonagold, Red Delicious, Ida Red, Fuji, Cameo and Russett

Two Glastonbury dogs were bitten by a rattler. Here’s what you need to know about Connecticut’s venomous snakes

The snakes of Connecticut have received renewed attention after a pair of dogs were bitten by a venomous timber rattlesnake in Glastonbury Aug. 16, but officials stress that these snakes pose little threat to humans in most parts of the state.According to the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, only two of the 14 native snake species found in the...

The snakes of Connecticut have received renewed attention after a pair of dogs were bitten by a venomous timber rattlesnake in Glastonbury Aug. 16, but officials stress that these snakes pose little threat to humans in most parts of the state.

According to the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, only two of the 14 native snake species found in the state are venomous — the northern copperhead and timber rattlesnake — and neither has a widespread distribution.

The timber rattler

The timber rattler, which is the species blamed for biting the Glastonbury dogs, is listed as an endangered species and is illegal to kill. There are two remnant populations of timber rattlesnakes in the northwest part of the state and in some Connecticut towns, including Glastonbury, East Hampton, Portland and Marlborough, according to the DEEP.

“I would estimate there are less than 500 timber rattlesnakes in central Connecticut,” said Dennis Quinn, owner of Quinn Ecological, an environmental consulting business that specializes in the research and conservation of Connecticut’s amphibians and reptiles. “The core population is in the northwest corner, where their habitat is less fragmented.”

Quinn Ecological was founded in 2007 to facilitate amphibian and reptile research, conservation and preservation. The consulting group offers a variety of services, ranging from general wildlife and habitat characterization surveys, to detailed environmental impact assessments complete with land use planning, mitigation design and monitoring for local, state and federal governments.

“They used to be found in over 20 different towns across the state, but that number has been reduced to just around 10 towns in different pockets,” Quinn said. “This is mainly due to habitat loss and human encroachment.”

(Douglas Hook)

The native Connecticut snake historically occurred in 31 states, but is now found in only 27 states. It ranges from southern New Hampshire, west through the Champlain Valley, south through the Appalachian and Blue Ridge Mountains, into northeastern Texas and north along the Mississippi River to Wisconsin.

Connecticut’s rattlesnakes are active mid-April through October. During the colder seasons, they retreat to communal dens that may include other snake species. After emerging from dens in spring, rattlesnakes will venture in search of food, basking sites, and shelter. Due to fragmentation and loss of natural habitat due to human encroachment, the animals are finding their way into people’s yards.

The northern copperhead

The other venomous snake native to the state, the northern copperhead, is mostly docile and nonaggressive, choosing to remain still and hidden rather than give away its position. This snake will take a defensive posture only when directly threatened. It may rapidly vibrate its tail like a rattlesnake, even though it has no rattles. While the northern copperhead is not listed as an endangered species, the killing of the snake is strongly discouraged by DEEP.

Why we need snakes

“There’s no reason to fear these animals,” said Brian Kleinman, reptile expert and owner of Riverside Reptiles Education Center in Enfield. “Biting is a last resort for snakes as once they release venom, they have to replenish it, which could take days or even longer for older snakes. In that period of time, they don’t have enough venom to kill prey they need to eat. So biting a human or dog would be solely out of a defensive posture.”

Kleinman, a former animal curator at The Children’s Museum in West Hartford, is now a steward of the 60-plus reptiles at the 13,000-square-foot center at 132 South Road. He collects animals on his own and is trusted by DEEP, UConn and the Audubon Society to take in animals they can’t keep.

“Snakes are extremely important ecologically,” Kleinman said. “They control rodent populations, eat pests and insects, and also act as food sources for certain birds and mammals. They are essential part of the food chain.”

Kleinman also said that studies have shown the importance of rattlesnakes in helping mitigate dangers to humans, including Lyme disease.

“Just one rattlesnake can eat up to 5,000 ticks in its lifetime,” Kleinman said. “The ticks, which carry Lyme and other diseases, are found on mice and rats and often drop into yards and parks. So by eating those creatures, the snake is also helping to stop the spread of Lyme disease in urban areas.”

What to do if you see a snake

Officials stress that if you encounter a venomous snake, observe it from a distance, calmly and slowly back away from it, and allow the snake to go on its way. Quick movements often scare snakes and may provoke a defensive strike. You should not try to agitate the snake by getting too close or handling it.

“If you see a rattlesnake or copperhead, don’t provoke it,” Kleinman said. “The best thing to do is just leave it alone.”

Kleinman said everyone should take precautions such as keeping pets on leashes, being vigilant of your surroundings and when walking in the woods making sure you’re wearing proper footwear, following clearly marked trails and being able to see where you’re stepping.

“Snakes have been in the state for tens of thousands of years,” Kleinman said. “We just need to be diligent but not afraid of these animals.”

Drought turns parts of Connecticut into a natural disaster area

For Hannah Tripp, these past two years of farming have been a “tale of two seasons.”Last year, rain left her fields filled with standing water and eroded her planting beds. This year, she said, “before this rain we got on Monday, it was a dust bowl.”“Our main irrigation pond is probably two feet below its normal level. We’re lucky it still has water in it. I know other area farmers who are out of water,” she said. “This is definitely the lowest I have ever seen it.”Mo...

For Hannah Tripp, these past two years of farming have been a “tale of two seasons.”

Last year, rain left her fields filled with standing water and eroded her planting beds. This year, she said, “before this rain we got on Monday, it was a dust bowl.”

“Our main irrigation pond is probably two feet below its normal level. We’re lucky it still has water in it. I know other area farmers who are out of water,” she said. “This is definitely the lowest I have ever seen it.”

Most of New England is experiencing drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Areas of eastern Massachusetts, virtually all of Rhode Island and parts of eastern Connecticut are listed by the agency as experiencing “extreme drought,” which is the agency’s second-worst categorization.

The dry weather is causing federal officials to act.

On Friday, state officials announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture declared New London and Windham counties natural disaster areas.

The designation means farm operators in those counties – and the nearby counties of Hartford, Middlesex and Tolland – are eligible for emergency loan assistance and crop insurance payments.

Speaking on Connecticut Public Radio’s Where We Live, state Agriculture Commissioner Bryan Hurlburt said he’s getting questions about whether droughts will be the new normal.

“I said, ‘Well, remember last year, we had way too much water. What’s to be expected is you can no longer expect anything,’” he said.

Farmers interested in applying for the assistance must contact their local Farm Service Agency office, Hurlburt said.

Friday’s drought declaration came as thunderstorms and heavy rainfall on Tuesday caused flash flooding in southern New England. Near Providence, Rhode Island, flooding closed roadways, backed up traffic and saturated basements. More thunderstorms impacted Connecticut Friday.

Experts say the region needs steady rain to end the drought. The heavy, short rainfall brought by the occasional thunderstorm tends to run off, not soak into the ground.

Chris Bassette, co-owner of Killam & Bassette Farmstead in South Glastonbury, said “farmers are the biggest gamblers in the world. Because every year we never know what we’re going to deal with, and weather is always such a huge part of that.”

Bassette said she is having to explain to her customers why some crops aren’t available.

“We can’t walk into a warehouse, grab what we need and put it in the bags for them,” she said.

Hannah Tripp, a lifelong resident of Salem who has farmed for over a decade, said farmers are seeing shifting seasons and longer snaps of cold, hot, and dry weather.

And that’s making farming – an already difficult profession – more and more difficult.

“That’s very challenging for growers to have to deal with the variability and the intensity,” Tripp said. “People who aren’t working outside or with food don’t always understand the impact that the weather is having.”

This story contains information from the Associated Press. Connecticut Public Radio's Lucy Nalpathanchil and Katie Pellico contributed to this report.

New Fairfield’s plan to build bus parking lot on school property sparks opposition and legal fight

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateNEW FAIRFIELD — The town is standing by its plan to construct a school bus parking lot on the site of the to-be-demolished Consolidated School, despite mounting opposition from residents and a legal fight.Residents unsuccessfully petitioned the Board of Selectmen to call a special town meeting for residents to vote on the plan, while the town and its Permanent Building Committee have appealed New Fairfield Zoning Commission’s denial of the proposal....

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NEW FAIRFIELD — The town is standing by its plan to construct a school bus parking lot on the site of the to-be-demolished Consolidated School, despite mounting opposition from residents and a legal fight.

Residents unsuccessfully petitioned the Board of Selectmen to call a special town meeting for residents to vote on the plan, while the town and its Permanent Building Committee have appealed New Fairfield Zoning Commission’s denial of the proposal.

“Consolidated is not an ideal site for a school bus parking lot,” Ball Pond Road resident Julie Stange said at an Aug. 25 Board of Selectmen meeting. “The buses are not attractive, and having them in plain sight (won’t) enhance anything.”

She and dozens of other residents signed a petition — submitted to the first selectman’s office Aug. 15 — that called on the Board of Selectmen to schedule a special town meeting to give residents and taxpayers the opportunity to weigh in on the Permanent Building Committee’s proposed plan to build the lot in the northwest corner of the site once the old elementary school is demolished.

The Board of Selectmen denied the petition in a 2-to-1 vote.

In their rejection, First Selectman Pat Del Monaco and Selectman Khris Hall cited legal opinion that the petition “poses a question that cannot lawfully be considered or acted upon at a special town meeting” in accordance with Section 7-1 of the Connecticut General Statutes.

In October 2019, taxpayers approved $29.2 million for the construction of a roughly 44,000-square-foot addition to Meeting House Hill School, known as the Consolidated Early Learning Academy.

The academy was proposed as a replacement for the Consolidated School at the corner of Gillotti and Ball Pond roads, and the plan has been to demolish the Consolidated School following the academy’s completion.

Legal battle

The New Fairfield Zoning Commission has twice rejected the proposal for the school bus parking lot, prompting the town and its Permanent Building Committee to appeal.

For statutory reasons, the matter is being handled in court, according to Del Monaco, who is also listed as a plaintiff in the case, along with the town.

“We did not have the option of going to the Zoning Board of Appeals,” she said. “We could only go to ZBA if the zoning enforcement officer had denied the application. Because it was the Zoning Commission, we have no choice but to appeal to the court.”

The appeal was filed at state Superior Court in Danbury on July 26, after the Zoning Commission voted to deny a site plan application for the proposed bus lot in June.

After receiving opposition from zoning commissioners — who cited aesthetic, environmental and property value concerns — on a special permit application in August 2021, the town withdrew that application, made some changes and came back with a site plan application in April 2022.

Following a public hearing, the Zoning Commission voted to deny the application.

In its lawsuit complaint, the town called the commission’s decision “unreasonable, improper, illegal (and) arbitrary” and “an abuse of the discretion, responsibilities and duties vested in the commission.”

The town, Permanent Building Committee and Del Monaco are being represented in the case by Glastonbury-based law firm of Alter & Pearson, while the Zoning Commission has retained the Hartford-based law firm of Halloran Sage, according to court records.

As of Wednesday, the commission had not filed a response to the complaint.

Del Monaco said she doesn’t know how long it might take for the matter to be settled in court, but the attorney for each side was hired by the town.

“My understanding is that the school project will pay for the PBC (Permanent Building Committee) attorney because that is related to the school project, and then the town will pay for the Zoning Commission’s attorney,” she said.

Both parties are town entities, but it’s not a case of the town fighting against itself, said Del Monaco, reiterating that taking the matter to court is the only available appeal option since statute doesn’t allow the town to appeal to the Zoning Board of Appeals.

Residents’ petition

Stange — who’s against putting a bus lot on the Consolidated property for aesthetic, traffic and other reasons — said using the site for school bus parking was not part of the plan voters approved nearly three years ago.

“Residents did not vote in favor of this bus lot in October 2019,” she said during the Board of Selectmen’s Aug. 25 special meeting.

Stange, who lives across the street from the Consolidated School, said the future of the site “had yet to be determined — let alone made public” at the time of the referendum, and abutting property owners like herself weren’t notified of the site plans until early 2021.

Using the Consolidated property for a school bus parking lot isn’t new, Del Monaco and Hall said — it’s been part of the ongoing school project.

Not only were there public hearing discussions about it prior to the October 2019 referendum, Del Monaco said, but “the plan was finalized and schematic drawings were produced” back in early 2020.

“This idea of the buses being parked at Consolidated has been part of the public domain for years,” she said. “There are several meetings a month regarding this school project that have been open to the public and online, so there was the ability of people to get the information.”

Hall noted that demolishing the Consolidated School and putting a bus lot on a portion of the property “were assumptions in the agreement between the state and New Fairfield,” which has earned a state grant for its two-school building project.

Bigelow Road resident Jennifer Huron said other sites should be explored. She said, as much as she doesn’t want it where she lives, she’s “well aware that (her) neighborhood could be a possible alternative location for the lot.”

But the Permanent Building Committee “looked at many locations” and concluded that the northwest corner of the Consolidated property is “the only feasible location in town,” said Don Kellog, the committee’s chairman, at a June 8 special Zoning Commission meeting.

Hall acknowledged residents’ concerns but said she believes changing plans now would not be in the best interest of the town and its residents.

“We will likely make some portion of New Fairfield voters angry (but) so be it,” she said. “My mandate is to weigh and balance all concerns for all citizens before making a decision, and I have concluded that the financial and other consequences of changing course at this late date outweigh the concerns that underline the petition.”

Changes were made to the original plans to address homeowners’ concerns, and a study showed traffic flow would actually be reduced in the area under the plan, Hall said.

“My guess is that it wouldn’t really matter where we put the bus lot — there will always be neighbors who are unhappy about it,” she said.

Del Monaco said the petition had 74 signatures, though some of them could not be confirmed by the town’s registrar of voters office.

10 CT ice cream places to check out over 4th of July weekend

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigateIf you're looking for a good scoop of ice cream, you won't have to travel far in the Nutmeg State. Across Connecticut, there are dozens of stands and creameries that are serving up the delicious summer treat all season long.Or, if you feel like taking a drive this long weekend, head to a spot outside your normal stomping grounds. We previously listed ...

This is a carousel. Use Next and Previous buttons to navigate

If you're looking for a good scoop of ice cream, you won't have to travel far in the Nutmeg State. Across Connecticut, there are dozens of stands and creameries that are serving up the delicious summer treat all season long.

Or, if you feel like taking a drive this long weekend, head to a spot outside your normal stomping grounds. We previously listed 11 ice cream places worth an afternoon drive in the state, but any of the ones on this list would fit the bill as well.

READ MORE: Connecticut's ice cream is the cherry on top of centuries of dairy farming history

Here are 10 more ice cream places to check out over the long weekend.

The Bethel landmark has been around since 1975, and earned a PEOPLE magazine honor as one of the best chocolate ice creams in the country in 1984 as well as a writeup in the New York Times in 1983. It's named after Dr. Michael S. Burnham, a dentist whose daughter who co-founded the shop. The signature “chocolate lace” flavor is still on the menu, but it’s been joined by some new entries, like minty Andes Candies and a recent stout ice cream, in partnership with Bethel’s own Broken Symmetry Gastro Brewery.

Open noon-10 p.m. daily at 158 Greenwood Ave. in Bethel.

Current owner Anthony Luciani purchased the iconic Norwalk landmark Mr. Chubbies in 2007 and transformed the spot into the now-famous Mr. Frosty’s Ice Cream Shop. Mr. Frosty’s has also expanded beyond its physical Norwalk location to include a mobile ice cream bar and a food truck that specializes in sliders.

Open 11 a.m.-10 p.m. daily at 6 1st St., Norwalk.

Around since 1988, the Cheshire ice cream parlor offers flavors like Nutella crunch, salty pretzel, “Claude’s Cupcake” with a cake batter flavored base and buttercream swirl, and even a “21+” flavor, Bailey’s Irish cream made with alcohol. Nonfat, sugar-free and dairy-free options are available, including flavors made with soy-based Tofutti and Silk almond milk.

Open noon-9 p.m. daily at 828 S Main St., Cheshire.

First established in 1850, this Shelton staple has grown to offer over 70 different flavors of ice cream. The creamery also sits on a sprawling farm that’s home to its resident cows, an onsite food truck and corn mazes in the fall.

Open noon-9 p.m. daily at 5 Beard Sawmill Road, Shelton.

Over 20 flavors of ice cream are served up daily at this ice cream stand in Ellington. What makes Kloter's stand out is its "Lucky Name of the Day" promotion, which ensures "a free small soft serve or a one scoop hard serve ice cream" for customers whose name is the name of the day. Have a unique name? Fear not. Kloter's sets aside Mondays for unusual and uncommon names.

Open noon-9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday at 216 West Road, Ellington.

Robb’s Farm Ice Cream Shop is situated on a farm that was first established in 1905, but the spot has only been serving ice cream since 2001. The shop offers more than 30 different flavors of ice cream with farm-inspired names like cow pies (peanut butter ice cream with cookie dough and chocolate chips), llama delight (chocolate ice cream with peanut butter swirl and peanut butter cups) and udderly ridiculous (vanilla ice cream with crushed mint cookies and fudge.)

Open 4 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, noon-8 p.m. Friday through Sunday at 91 Wassuc Roadd, South Glastonbury.

Artisanal flavors are the name of the game at this Danbury family-owned ice cream parlor. Whether you want to try vanilla ginger, dulce de leche or guava ice cream, Dubl Twister boasts enough wild flavors to keep customers on their toes every visit.

Open 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. at 164 White St., Danbury

"A Meriden tradition since 1952," Les' Dairy Bar's seasonal soft serves draw crowds around the building. New flavors are always in rotation each week.

Open noon-9 p.m. daily at 654 E Main St., Meriden

This mother-daughter dessert house in Chester offers handcrafted ice cream with fresh waffle cones, sauces and toppings made in house. Recent featured flavors have included chili chocolate, honey almond, pineapple sorbet and non-dairy options like toasted coconut and raspberry chip.

Open noon-9 p.m. Wednesday through Monday at 29 Main St., Chester

The iconic exterior of this tried-and-true Durham classic is almost as iconic as its ice cream. Cones are piled high and sundaes are filled to the brim, ensuring you'll get the most bang for your buck.

Open noon-9:30 p.m. daily at 13 Main St., Durham.

Andrew DaRosa works for the digital team at Hearst Connecticut Media, both producing online content as well as maintaining homepages.

Andrew is an award-winning journalist and holds a degree in digital journalism from Fairfield University.

When he's not writing, he is spending time with his dogs or going to see live music.

Leeanne is the food and consumer reporter for Hearst Connecticut, handling coverage of restaurant openings and closings, trends, events and general news about CT food and beverage businesses.

She's been working in Connecticut news for more than 15 years, most recently as the food and dining reporter for the Hartford Courant. A native of Worcester, Mass., she holds a master's degree in journalism from Quinnipiac University.

Marina Indian takeout restaurant opens in South Glastonbury

Glastonbury’s restaurant scene seems to be rebounding from the pandemic and becoming more eclectic every day. The newest cuisine in town is Indian. Marina opened April 14 at 2249 New London Turnpike, serving primarily takeout lunch and dinner, and soon, perhaps, breakfast.Senthil Kumar Gurunathan, one of the partners, is from Chennai, in the southern Tamil Nadu state. The restaurant, which is in South Glastonbury where Gbury to Go used to be, is named after a huge beach in Chennai.In southern India, food tends to be spicy...

Glastonbury’s restaurant scene seems to be rebounding from the pandemic and becoming more eclectic every day. The newest cuisine in town is Indian. Marina opened April 14 at 2249 New London Turnpike, serving primarily takeout lunch and dinner, and soon, perhaps, breakfast.

Senthil Kumar Gurunathan, one of the partners, is from Chennai, in the southern Tamil Nadu state. The restaurant, which is in South Glastonbury where Gbury to Go used to be, is named after a huge beach in Chennai.

In southern India, food tends to be spicy.

“We use them all, garam masala, chili, cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, star anise, fennel, cumin, bay leaves,” Gurunathan said.

The menu at Marina is a mix of spicy and mild dishes, to suit all tastes.

“We can make spicy foods less spicy, medium, but we cannot make the spicy foods mild,” said Gurunathan, who lives in South Windsor. “We don’t want to just focus on Indian people, we want to focus on all people.”

The menu is full of what Gurunathan called “everyday food in India,” with a lot of meatless options, because up to 40% of residents of India are vegetarian.

Appetizers come in veg, chicken, goat, lamb and seafood, and range from $7.99 for a simple three-piece potato and pea samosa platter, to $17.99 for the lamb fry and mutton chukka, in which the meat is layered with spices. Other appetizers include the spicy kodi vepudu, chili chicken and chili paneer, and the milder shrimp pepper fry, baby corn Manchurian and onion padkoda fritters.

Entrees, ranging from 11.99 for a dal fry to $17.99 for a lamb tikka masala, also have spicy options such as shrimp, mutton or fish curries, vindaloos and kadai chicken. Milder options include the vegetarian Navratan korma and peanut butter masala and chicken Chettinad.

The menu also features tandoori vegetables, chicken, shrimp and fish; biryani made with egg, vegetables, chicken, goat, lamb or shrimp; desserts such as gulab jamun, kheer and rasmalai; as well as beverages and sides.

Gurunathan said Marina has applied for an outdoor dining permit to put a few dozen seats on a grassy strip to the side of the restaurant. He also hopes to eventually serve Indian breakfast foods, such as dosa, idli and medu vada, which are basically savory donuts made with coconut, herbs and spices.

Marina is open 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday to Sunday, closing for 2 ½ hours daily and reopening from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 5 to 8:30 p.m. Sunday to Thursday. Closed Monday.

SOMETHING’S COOKING: Flynn’s Grill

Something’s Cooking takes you to a Glastonbury restaurant where you won’t need the luck of the Irish to enjoy a great meal.SOUTH GLASTONBURY, CT (WFSB) - If picking the perfect place for a St. Patrick’s lunch feels more difficult than finding the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, don’t worry, the Something’s Cooking crew has your back.Something’s Cooking takes you to a Glastonbury restaurant where you won’t need the luck of the Irish to enjoy a great meal.Flynn’s Grill i...

Something’s Cooking takes you to a Glastonbury restaurant where you won’t need the luck of the Irish to enjoy a great meal.

SOUTH GLASTONBURY, CT (WFSB) - If picking the perfect place for a St. Patrick’s lunch feels more difficult than finding the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, don’t worry, the Something’s Cooking crew has your back.

Something’s Cooking takes you to a Glastonbury restaurant where you won’t need the luck of the Irish to enjoy a great meal.

Flynn’s Grill in South Glastonbury brings a little piece of Ireland to Connecticut.

If laughter is in the air, shamrocks are on the wall, and great food is on the table,

“This is the standard french toast with a side of bacon.”

You must be at Flynn’s Grill in Glastonbury.

“It’s one big Irish family.”

The patriarch of this family is Enda Flynn.

He was born and raised in Ireland before moving to Connecticut to raise a family and spread his culinary talents.

Enda takes every meal seriously, but his Irish roots mean St. Patrick’s Day is truly special here!

“This place will be mobbed all day long from 11 o’clock from three in the afternoon.”

Thursday, most customers will enjoy Enda’s signature St. Patrick’s Day special, which is good enough to ensure that Irish eyes will be smiling.

“99 percent of people are going to come out and order corned beef and cabbage cause that’s what they associate with Ireland,” said Enda

Enda hopes some customers expand their horizons by trying his roast lamb special or the Irish Rueben, with grilled homemade corned beef, sauerkraut, thousand island dressing and swiss cheese.

You also can’t go wrong with a classic corned beef benny, topped with shredded potatoes.

“We all come in here because we love Flynn, and we are all Irish when we come in here,” said Bruce Burnham of Glastonbury.

“I am Greek and Italian,” said Julia Hancin, a waitress at Flynn’s. “I’m Irish when I’m here. Every nationality should celebrate their heritage what they brought to America.”

Enda says he’ll have two types of customers on Thursday.

“There’s Irish and people who want to be Irish right,” Enda said.

For more information on Flynn’s Grill, click here.

Copyright 2022 WFSB. All rights reserved.

Glastonbury High School Class of 2022

GLASTONBURY — These students graduated Glastonbury High School on Friday:Russell Abankwah, Joseph Accurso, Aidan Adams, Gabrielle Agcaoili, Sedra Al Abas, Lena Alibrio, Yusuf Allam, Alana Anderson, Matthew Anderson, Nicholas Anderson, Christopher Andriola, Anastasiya Andriyashko, Paige Annecchino, Zachary Arnold, Maria Aspris, Natalie Assante, Melisa Atanovic, Macy Athorne, Rebecca Ayers, Nathan Azimov.Chase Babich, Aliya Babineau, Angelina Barbanel, Holly Barbieri, Ryan Barcikowski, Lucas Barker, Matthew Barker, Jamie Ba...

GLASTONBURY — These students graduated Glastonbury High School on Friday:

Russell Abankwah, Joseph Accurso, Aidan Adams, Gabrielle Agcaoili, Sedra Al Abas, Lena Alibrio, Yusuf Allam, Alana Anderson, Matthew Anderson, Nicholas Anderson, Christopher Andriola, Anastasiya Andriyashko, Paige Annecchino, Zachary Arnold, Maria Aspris, Natalie Assante, Melisa Atanovic, Macy Athorne, Rebecca Ayers, Nathan Azimov.

Chase Babich, Aliya Babineau, Angelina Barbanel, Holly Barbieri, Ryan Barcikowski, Lucas Barker, Matthew Barker, Jamie Bassette, Adelaide Bawah, Daniel Beagle, Ryan Beard, Natalie Bedard, Taylor Begun, Brooke Beighau, Ryan Bell, Catherine Bentivegna, Madelyn Bergin, Nathalia Bermudez, Samuel Bernier, Anthony Bible, Genevieve Bird, Anne Bestor Blair, AeRin Bochicchio, Grace Boehning, Olivia Bogdan, Nikhitha Boggavarapu, Benjamin Boisoneau, Jonathan Borderi, Trevor Boyaji, Andrew Breen, Bianca Brennan, Samantha Brescia, Meghan Brink, John Michael Briones, Rebekah Bronstein, Heather Bronzi, Maddox Bruening, Eric Bruneau, Grace Bryant, Matthew Bulger, Grace Burk, Luke Burns, Alexa Burton, Sophia Burton, Mahari Bush.

Hannah Caiola, Reese Calhoun, Jasmin Callahan, Tucker Cameron, Allison Campbell, Gabriella Canihuante, Michael Cannata, Daniel Cantafi, Zachary Caporale, Tyler Carcio, Rose Carlson, Kevin Carmichael, Nicholas Caron, Amelia Carroll, Isaac Carter, Garrison Case, Emma Cegielski, Warren Channing, Delina Chávez, Jaden Chen, Kevin Chen, Anisha Chowdhury, Evelina Christensen, Alayna Christina, Samantha Chung, Timeea Ciolac, Bridget Clarke, Kevin Clarke, Andrew Clarkin, Amelia Cody, Michael Connolly III, Gwendolyn Connor, Alberto Cortes, Genelisse Costa, Madalena Costa, Asa Cox, Taylor Cronin, McKenna Crosse, Cole Cummings, Alexina Cunha, Nathan Cyr, Roman Czapiga, John Czarnecki.

David Daigle, Joseph Daley, Nathaniel Daly, Tyler DaMotta, Nicholas Danese, Matthew Daniels, Natalie Dauch, Hannah David, Andrew Davis, Rachel Davis, Stephen Dayton, Sofia DeCrescenzo, Michael DeDominicis, Katarina Delaney, Ella DeLucia, Kathryn DeSousa, Jason DeWolf, Ryan Deyo, Joshua DiCicco, Keegan Dickinson, Olivia Dickson, Nicholas DiNino, Flynn Doherty, Charlie Dolan, Kathryn Donovan, Matthew Doucette, Barrett Dube, Meghan Duddu, Kyle Durant, Molly Edgington, Michael Efremov, Noor Eideh, Aisha Ekpe, Ryan Entner.

Louis Fagnoni, Luke Fahey, Sophia Fan, Addison Fastiggi, Kiley Feeney, Nicholas Feery, Jalaiya Felicier, Joanne Feng, Sean Flannery, Javier Flores, Gabrielle Fluckiger, Ella Forgione, Kate Fradin, Aidan Gagnon, Elizabeth Galjan, Lauren Gallagher, Isha Gandhi, Dhivya Ganesh, Caitlin Garland, Noah Garrity, Zoë Gates, Noah Gatua, Alexander George, Jack Gherard, Sonia Ghoshal, Sophia Gibilisco, Paul Giliberto, Michael Gillespie, Benjamin Giroux, Carlos Gonzalez, Connor Goode, Sabine Gordon, Sree Gorty, Angela Gould, Tyler Goulet, Aldo Gramajo Osorio, Kevin Graziosi, Andrew Greco, Vincenzo Greco, Ashton Grenus, Christina Guanci, Sydney Gudrian, King Joshua Guerrero, Cesar Gutierrez.

Rachel Ha, Lila Haas, Olivia Hacker, William Haddad Jr., Abdul-Rahman Haggar, Elliot Hamilton, Zhengxi Han, Caroline Hapgood, Molly Harding, Joseph Hart, Sophia Haussmann, Tyler Heaney, Zackary Heggelke, Brendan Henck, Jack Hennessy, Matthew Hepp, Samantha Hernandez, Leire Hernando, Matthew Herrera, Colin Hersom, Michael Hervieux, Ineshka Hettiarachchi, Aiden Hill, Persephone Hill, Kylie Hilliard, Kayden Hinchey, Ryan Hoffman, Ruviha Homma, Justin Howe, Nicholas Huempfner, Tyler Huff, Ilana Hunt, Preston Hunt, Annika Hurley, Tayte Hutchinson, Stephan Jack, Anushka Jain, Aidan Januario, Nicole Jasmin, Sanjana Jatti, Drew Jean, Meghan Jeroszko, Alison Johnson, Margaret Johnson, Nicholas Johnson, Alexa Jones, Mia Jones, Zahrah Julian, George Juliano, Ian Jurewicz.

Emma Kantor, Matthew Kaplan, Vera Karacica, Ananya Karthik, Sawyer Kasanowski, Aastha Kashyap, Drew Kaufman, Brooke Keeshan, Sydney Kehl, Abeeha Khan, Anzal Khan, Jonah Kiesman, Brady King, Ian Kinney, Njoki Kinyua, Owen Korper, Caroline Koziol, Zachary Kridler, Tate Kruse, Christopher Lacroix, Meredith Lambert, Francesca Lanata, Sarah Lavoie, Theodora Lazaridis, Benjamin Le, Zachary Lebowitz, Tennaly LeClaire, Christopher Leduc, Abigail Lee, Olivia Lee, Audrey LeMasurier, Katelyn Levesque, Ryan Logan, Oliver Lojas, Benjamin Longshore, Riley Lord, Victoria Loukas, Julianne Lui, Jarod Luis, Myles Lushing.

Lia Maag, Michael Maciolek, Alicia Malena, Elizabeth Martin, Dominic Martinez, Umesh Venkat Matcha Rajan, Emily Mazella, Julia Mazella, Eshal Mazid, Kane Mazur, Matteo Mazzotta, Lucy McAllister, John McArdle, John McCarthy, Shea McGuigan, Ella McKee, Brogan McKenna, Calder McKenna, Abigail McKeon, Mary McKiernan, Sarah McKinney, Elijah McWhite, Cali Melocowsky, Evan Melocowsky, Andrew Miclette, Brooke Milikowski, Ezekiel Molina, Garrett Molinari, Alana Mondschein, Rachel Mondschein, Grace Mooney, Liam Moran, Grace Morande, Garrett Morris, Shen Morrison, Sarah Moses, Emma Motl, Spencer Moy, Isabella Mraz, Eva Mulholland, Griffin Mulligan, Kathryn Murphy, Myles Murphy, Nicholas Murphy, Ryan Murphy, Alyssa Myers.

John Nardone, Justin Nascimento, Katherine Nathan, Rohan Nethala, Donald Newandee, Austin Newhouse, Vivian Nguyen, Jeneddis Nieves, Rose Nighan, Jack Niland, Nadine Noaman, Zander Norris, Rilee O’Doherty, Sarah Ongley, Jaden Opokuware, Graciela Orama, Daimanuel Ortiz Collazo, Francesco Ossino, Theodore Packard, Shiraliben Padaliya, Norell Paluska, Paavani Panganamamula, Emili Pani, Kaitlyn Parent, Julia Parkin, Jordan Parsons, Emma Pascoe, Kunj Patel, Joshua Patermo, Brian Pawlowski, Sophia Pers, Annika Petrov, James Petruzzi, Cole Pezzente, Cameron Pinkowski, Emily Pinney, Erin Pizzo, Samuel Poesnecker, Madison Poetto, Nathan Pollman, Riya Prakash, Nora Printy, Isabelle Protulis.

Patrick Quinn, Imran Qureshi, Najeed Rahman, Aditya Rajesh, Sandesh Ramesh, Xavier Rayford, Nora Rayyashi, Lucinda Reed, Alejandro Reilly, Peter Rice, Sara Rigatti, Leon Rios, Di-Aneliz Rivera, Davián Rivera Muñiz, Sophia Rodrigues, Alex Rodriguez, Eric-John Rose, Maxwell Rosenbush, Lola Rotelli, Luke Roy, Toula Rumery, Sabrina Russotto, Connor Ryan, Thomas Ryen.

Joseph Salamone, Youssef Sallam, Hannah Sampson, Jessie Sampson, Tucker Sampson, Carol Samuel, Kimberly Santana, Olivia Santostefano, Michael Sardo, Sean Savidge, Jack Schaffner, Natalie Schlichting, Caileigh Schroeder, Chayse Scott, Evan Scott, Logan Scott, Sadie Scurto, Emily Senna, Patrick Serksnas, Genevieve Shadron, Aliyah Shah, Jay Shah, Arushi Sharma, Michael Shea, Rhea Shukla, Alicja Sicko, Ethan Sill, Daniel Silvester, Jack Simmon, Jenna Simmon, Valerie Simon, Gaurisha Singh, Amelia Siuda, Mia Smarrelli, Meghan Smith, Joshua Souder, Benjamin Sowa, Lindsey Spencer, Valerie St. Laurent, Jenna Stanley, Shaoyang Stassen, Amanda Steckler, Owen Stephens, Cody Stone, Jackson Stone, Emily Szydlo, Adam Szymonik.

Sirina Tajudeen, Lucy Talbot, Ali Taleb, Tia Taleb, Vijay Tandon, Andrew Taylor, Thomas Tencza, Charles Tennyson III, Braden Thomas, Lillie Thomas, Christi Thrower, William Tillinghast, Leaf Tine, Ruby Toolan, William Torrey, Brooke Tracy, Alex Tran, Alexis Tran, Lindsay Tryon, Maria Tuxbury, Quinn Twombly, Sophia Urban, Ethan Valle, Victoria VanCedarfield, Rishwanth Vidhya, Simon Villamizar, Palash Vora, Nicholas Wadleigh, Brendon Wagner, Alexis Walden, Griffin Walsh, Brandon Walstedt, Colin Wechsler, Jingkang Wei, Alexander Weiss, Kaitlyn Welsh, Sara Wertsching, Samantha Whaples, Nicole Wijendra, Benjamin Wilkinson, Mitchell Williams, Henry Wilson, Grace Woznicki, Emma Xhoxhi, Isabella Yacka, Nathan Yost, Khaliq Young, Catherine Zak, Amanda Zawila, Joseph Zeppieri, Athanasios Zervantaridis, Jennifer Zhang, BingQian Zheng, Jason Zhou.

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