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Home Care in Old Lyme, CT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that's how it should be - a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren't able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today's world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in Old Lyme, CT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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Home Care Old Lyme, CT

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients' lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a "one size fits all" approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life's little moments - where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can't quite keep up with life's daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in Old Lyme, CT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in Old Lyme, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

 In-Home Care Old Lyme, CT

Types of In-home Care in Old Lyme, CT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

 Elderly Care Old Lyme, CT

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming
 Senior Care Old Lyme, CT

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Respite Care Old Lyme, CT

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings
 Caregivers Old Lyme, CT

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior's daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in Old Lyme, CT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

Home Care Old Lyme, CT
  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client's individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor's appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior's needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

 In-Home Care Old Lyme, CT

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Old Lyme, CT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

 Elderly Care Old Lyme, CT

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Old Lyme, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

 Senior Care Old Lyme, CT

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran's Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Old Lyme,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in Old Lyme, CT

Strong Showing by State Legislators to Support Shore Line East Expansion

CLINTON – On Wednesday, a bipartisan group of state legislators took the opportunity of a Connecticut Commuter Rail Council meeting to voice support for a long-discussed expansion of Shore Line East.“It’s really heartening to see commuters and legislators here,” said Jim Gildea, chair of CCRC, in response to the unusually well-attended council meeting.The council met to discuss two key priorities – returning Shore Line East to its pre-Covid schedule and expanding rail service in eastern Connecticut...

CLINTON – On Wednesday, a bipartisan group of state legislators took the opportunity of a Connecticut Commuter Rail Council meeting to voice support for a long-discussed expansion of Shore Line East.

“It’s really heartening to see commuters and legislators here,” said Jim Gildea, chair of CCRC, in response to the unusually well-attended council meeting.

The council met to discuss two key priorities – returning Shore Line East to its pre-Covid schedule and expanding rail service in eastern Connecticut.

A presentation by Eric Bergeron, assistant rail administrator for the Connecticut Department of Transportation, reported that Shore Line East currently operates at 66 percent of its pre-Covid schedule.

But while Bergeron said that ridership has returned to other commuter lines as they’ve returned service, for Shore Line East funding is a constraint.

“Every single rail system is subsidized,” said State Sen. Osten, D-Sprague, co-chair of the Appropriations Committee, in comments to attendees. “And I think that that’s a good investment of the public’s dollars.”

According to a 2021 Connecticut Creates report, Shore Line East ranked among the highest-cost commuter rail lines in the country with a state subsidy of $55.28 per ride.

During a phone call with CT Examiner, Gildea acknowledged the Shore Line East subsidy, but said there is not a method of transportation in the country that is not subsidized.

He said the significant turnout of politicians at the meeting showed him that the legislature is poised to support investment in rail.

“[Osten] clearly said that the legislature has given the Department of Transportation whatever they’ve asked for, and if they need additional funding to support a restoration of 100 percent service, all they have to do is ask.”

Along with Osten, legislators including State Sen. Heather Somers, R-Goton, State Rep. Christine Goupil, D-Clinton, State Rep. Christine Conley, D-Groton, and State Rep. Devin Carney, R-Old Lyme, took part in the hybrid meeting.

Several voiced support for 2021 legislation, HB 5423, directing the commissioner of transportation to conduct a feasibility study for extending Shore Line East to Rhode Island, establish a Norwich rail line, create new train stations in Groton and the borough of Stonington and bring interconnectivity between the systems.

The results of that study were due by Jan. 1, 2022. Jill Cahoon, the consultant project manager, said the study is still underway, and is only the first step in a line of studies.

“I also would like to see us stop studying things and move the projects along,” Osten said.

The idea of expanding Shore Line East to Westerly, RI has been a long-time topic for discussion, previously appearing in a 2001 Rhode Island Department of Transportation report, former Gov. Dannel Malloy’s 30-year transit plan, and a 2016 recommendation by the state’s Public Transportation Commission.

At Wednesday’s council meeting, Goupil said she wanted connectivity between buses and rail. Conley said she needed service for commuters to support Groton’s largest employers. Somers asked for weekend trains to Mystic in the summer.

After the meeting, Osten told CT Examiner that advocates needed for legislators to keep talking about the expansion to get the proper funding.

“They can’t vote on something that nobody is sponsoring and bringing to them,” Osten said.

Subdivision Planned Near Public Landing on Buttonball Road in Old Lyme

OLD LYME — A developer has opened an application for an eight-lot subdivision on Buttonball Road. The wooded area is located across the street from a town-owned site currently under much-debated consideration as a public boat launch.The subdivision would be built at 21 and 39 Buttonball Road, two parcels that together total about 12.5 acres. The project was proposed by Greenscapes Development, of Mystic, at the Sept. 8 Planning Commission meeting.If approved, all eight lots would be at least one acre in size and have fron...

OLD LYME — A developer has opened an application for an eight-lot subdivision on Buttonball Road. The wooded area is located across the street from a town-owned site currently under much-debated consideration as a public boat launch.

The subdivision would be built at 21 and 39 Buttonball Road, two parcels that together total about 12.5 acres. The project was proposed by Greenscapes Development, of Mystic, at the Sept. 8 Planning Commission meeting.

If approved, all eight lots would be at least one acre in size and have frontage on Buttonball Road. At their rear boundary, each parcel borders the Black Hall Golf Club.

The location of the lots is across the street from a town-owned three-acre parcel at 36-1 Buttonball Road that was proposed as a public boat launch for the Black Hall River. After debates over jurisdiction, three town boards agreed to form 36-1 Buttonball Road Committee to resolve access issues.

The developer has proposed about 1.88 acres, or 15 percent of the total acreage, as open space, according to Seamus Moran, a civil engineer with H+H Engineering Associates, who represented Greenscapes at the meeting.

According to the Sept. 8 Planning Commission minutes, the open space “will protect the wetlands, steep slope, and the natural environment features and provides a contiguous parcel along the golf course.”

Wetlands straddle .37 and .36 acres of each lot, but no vernal pools have been identified on the properties. The project will require an Inland Wetlands Permit, said Moran.

In a phone call with CT Examiner, Dave Reagan, owner of Greenscapes Development and Reagan Homes, said he has been building custom homes from Westerly to Essex for more than 30 years.

“Obviously we’re always concerned with our neighbors and the town and the community. We don’t want to cut down a lot of trees. We want to keep what’s there, keep the natural beauty,” he said. “We’re not looking to build McMansions, we want our new homes to be in keeping with New England shoreline design.”

Adjacent to the project, 11 Buttonball Road is for sale. The 22-acre property contains a 1,000-square-foot house and fronts Buttonball Road and Shore Road, and at the back borders the Black Hall Golf Club.

The public hearing for the eight-lot subdivision is scheduled for the Planning Commission Oct. 13 meeting.

Legal Review Says Public Landing in Old Lyme Dates to 1701, Homeowners Say it is Full of Errors

OLD LYME — A legal expert’s report commissioned by the town attorney has concluded that Tantummaheag landing is a public road, but the adjacent landowners issued a statement today disagreeing with the findings and offering alternatives.Elton B. Harvey III of Isaac Law Offices, LLC, said his review of “the deeds of the Lord families and the Coult families, which owned property on either side of Tantummaheag Road from 1701 forward showed a consistent use of the North and South sides of a highway now known a Tantummahea...

OLD LYME — A legal expert’s report commissioned by the town attorney has concluded that Tantummaheag landing is a public road, but the adjacent landowners issued a statement today disagreeing with the findings and offering alternatives.

Elton B. Harvey III of Isaac Law Offices, LLC, said his review of “the deeds of the Lord families and the Coult families, which owned property on either side of Tantummaheag Road from 1701 forward showed a consistent use of the North and South sides of a highway now known a Tantummaheag Road as a boundary for their respective conveyances.”

Among his findings, Harvey said that maps from an 1868 New London County atlas show Tantummaheag Road running from Neck Road to Lord’s Cove and that a 1958 Connecticut Department of Transportation map showed the route as an improved road “until it reaches the shore of the Connecticut River.”

But in a statement released today, George Frampton and Carla D’Arista, owners of 12 and 19 Tantummaheag Road, said the report was factually incorrect and that there was no evidence proving the driveway had been a public highway at any time over the past 300 years.

Frampton and D’Arista said the 1931 survey showing the town’s right of way was fraudulent, but said they were willing to pursue an alternative outside of their property boundary.

“Moreover, we are quite happy to discuss reconstructing and deeding a right of appropriate and limited public access along the original right of way, which we have absolutely no obligation to do, creating a parking place for one car out of sight of our home and access to the ice pond – – if that’s what the Town wants,” they wrote. “But that would require consent of our neighbor on whose property the right-of-way also ran to reach the current pond, and would probably require that the parking place be on level ground of his property in order to be safely situated.”

Their statement also offered that ”there might be some basis for a resolution that allows pedestrian access only, a resolution that would be mutually beneficial for our neighbors while preserving our safely (sic) and ownership interests.”

Frampton and D’Arista said they have “consistently welcomed polite neighbors and townspeople to walk down our driveway to the ice-pond and river,” and to park on the street outside their property.

“We hope and plan to continue to do so unless the Town makes this a continuing threat to our safety and privacy, which it has over the past two years,” they said.

First Selectman Tim Griswold could not be reached for comment.

Cate Hewitt is a reporter and Associate Editor for CT Examiner. Hewitt covers planning and zoning issues.

Old Lyme seeking input on future of Sound View area

Old Lyme ? A committee charged with creating a vision for the shoreline area is asking what residents want to see along Route 156 and Sound View Beach.The Shoreline Gateway Committee announced a survey this week for year-round residents, seasonal residents and business owners to gauge their perceptions of the area and their thoughts on its future. The survey is available online at ...

Old Lyme ? A committee charged with creating a vision for the shoreline area is asking what residents want to see along Route 156 and Sound View Beach.

The Shoreline Gateway Committee announced a survey this week for year-round residents, seasonal residents and business owners to gauge their perceptions of the area and their thoughts on its future. The survey is available online at www.oldlymesurvey.com.

The “gateway” encompasses Shore Road from Otter Rock Road to Breen Avenue, as well as Hartford Avenue to Sound View Beach. The committee is looking only at commercially-zoned properties, including those in the Sound View Village District.

As a public beach in an otherwise private enclave, Sound View is still trying to recover from a seedy reputation going back at least to World War II. The area then was characterized by bars and strippers.

The village district was created in 2005 to relax some of the town's strict zoning rules in the hope of encouraging property owners to renovate their buildings. It was part of redevelopment efforts going back decades.

Committee co-chairwoman Martha Shoemaker, who is also a selectwoman, said the survey is part of “an inclusive process” with the goal of preserving the important historical area and making it attractive going forward.

“This is an opportunity for people to have their opinions heard, and to help reach a consensus that will meet the future needs of the town's residents, businesses, and the local environment,” Shoemaker said.

The committee was formed by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the Economic Development Commission in early 2022. Membership includes beach association members and townspeople with expertise in areas such as zoning, community beautification, small business development and housing. Members are currently assessing zoning regulations and looking at improvements made by other shoreline communities.

The survey is online now and will be open through Oct. 7. Printed copies will be available at the Old Lyme Town Hall starting Sept. 7.

For more information, contact the first selectman’s office at 860-434-1605 or go to www.oldlyme-ct.gov/shoreline-gateway-committee.

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‘Amphora’ Retrospective at Lyme Academy Celebrates 40 Years of Work by Old Lyme Artist Pat Smith

OLD LYME — The Lyme Academy of Fine Arts presents Amphora, a retrospective survey of four decades of work of the Old Lyme-based artist Patricia Smith (b.1942).Amphora is both a celebration of the earth and the earliest crafts it bore, and a deeply personal tribute to Smith’s enduring muse. The exhibition will be on view in the Academy’s Sill House Gallery from Aug. 28, through Sept. 18, 2022.Spanning a wide range of media, this exhibition takes as its signature piece the icon...

OLD LYME — The Lyme Academy of Fine Arts presents Amphora, a retrospective survey of four decades of work of the Old Lyme-based artist Patricia Smith (b.1942).

Amphora is both a celebration of the earth and the earliest crafts it bore, and a deeply personal tribute to Smith’s enduring muse. The exhibition will be on view in the Academy’s Sill House Gallery from Aug. 28, through Sept. 18, 2022.

Spanning a wide range of media, this exhibition takes as its signature piece the iconic pottery vessel that defined the ancient world, and represents Smith’s initial calling and primal connection to her creative vocation.

Raised in Manchester, England, Smith found her way to the Greek archaeological site of Knossos at the age of 20. It was there that she fell in love with the art of pottery, and began what would become a lifelong journey into the arts.

In the early 1980s, Smith was initiated into her true material — porcelain — from a fellow potter and collaborator. Together they explored deeply the possibilities of the material, including mold-making and slip-casting with liquid clay, and developed complex high-fire celadon and ash glazes. It was this transformative moment that revolutionized Smith’s conception of ceramics.

After relocating to a Soho loft in New York City, and with a studio of her own, Smith’s creativity with porcelain seemed to know no bounds. Black and white elemental pieces gave way to a new series of nerikomi works, which featured (natural) white porcelain streaked with blue veins.

Smith also began producing hand-built bowls, made by overlapping paper-thin strips of porcelain to form an open, woven form. Their raw, torn edges evoke a primal, organic quality that is wholly reflective of Smith’s profound and resonant approach.

In the 1980s and ’90s, Smith was actively working and showing throughout the United States. She taught ceramics at Parsons School of Design for a brief period before leaving her years of teaching to focus on her own work.

She began experimenting with new techniques, such as watercolor and cyanotype, and her porcelain work began to incorporate the expressiveness of these other mediums. Smith continued to work in clay, however, allowing each of the materials she explored to intertwine, engage, and mutually inform.

In the late 1990s, Smith left New York with her husband to settle in Connecticut, where she established a new studio, in addition to spending several months of the year at their home in Paris.

These months in Paris without a kiln inspired her to invent new ways of working without clay, leading to another breakthrough, which was the use of paper as a substitute for porcelain. In this way, Smith began to work the paper to produce similar forms and effects that she had achieved in porcelain.

Eventually paper and porcelain were used almost interchangeably, combined with other elements such as thread, cloth, wood or stone, making the two pure white materials contained the essence of the work.

“Making art is a journey, a weaving of recurring themes and inspirations, unraveling layers of the self and illuminating an inner tapestry of memories and images” says Smith. “My own journey has led me from England to France and finally here to Old Lyme.”

Smith adds, “I am so grateful to Lyme Academy for giving me this precious opportunity to share my art.”

Although Smith’s art over the years has clearly extended beyond the making of clay vessels, she maintains that she is fundamentally a potter at heart. The amphora that the 20-year-old carried home from Knossos remains with her today, continuing to serve as the symbolic container of her original passion and now, with this exhibition, the representation of her life’s work.

Editor’s Note: ‘Amphora, A Pat Smith Retrospective’ is on view in Lyme Academy’s Sill House Gallery Aug. 28, through Sept. 18, 2022, Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Forty percent of the proceeds from the sale of artwork from the exhibition will be contributed to Lyme Academy of Fine Arts.

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