Request More Information

Home Care in Hebron, CT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that’s how it should be – a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren’t able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today’s world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That’s where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in Hebron, CT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

Service Areas

What Our Clients Are Saying

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients’ lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a “one size fits all” approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life’s little moments – where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can’t quite keep up with life’s daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in Hebron, CT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in Hebron, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliché, it’s especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

Types of In-home Care in Hebron, CT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior’s daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in Hebron, CT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client’s individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor’s appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior’s needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it’s true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior’s home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home’s emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior’s home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Hebron, CT, seniors don’t have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors’ health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors’ quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom – much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it’s usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

With Always Best Care’s home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Hebron, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you’re worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran’s Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior’s private insurance plan. Read over your loved one’s insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver’s role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors’ minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Hebron,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior’s day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in Hebron

Meet The 2022 U.S. Paralympic Wheelchair Curling Team

Just under two months after they secured a spot for the U.S. in wheelchair curling at the Paralympic Winter Games Beijing 2022, the same five athletes learned Friday they’ll be the ones going to Beijing to try and win their country’s first wheelchair curling medal.Skip Matthew Thums, vice skip Steve Emt, second David Samsa, lead Oyuna Uranchimeg and alternate Pam Wilson were officially named as the 2022 U.S. Paralympic Team by National Coach Rusty Schieber and National Team Director Pete Annis.“These athletes ...

Just under two months after they secured a spot for the U.S. in wheelchair curling at the Paralympic Winter Games Beijing 2022, the same five athletes learned Friday they’ll be the ones going to Beijing to try and win their country’s first wheelchair curling medal.

Skip Matthew Thums, vice skip Steve Emt, second David Samsa, lead Oyuna Uranchimeg and alternate Pam Wilson were officially named as the 2022 U.S. Paralympic Team by National Coach Rusty Schieber and National Team Director Pete Annis.

“These athletes bought in and never looked back,” Schieber said in a USA Curling release. “They have given all they’ve got for the last 20 months, and it starts again March 3.”

March 3 is when the Games kick off from Beijing, where Team USA will be looking to reverse its Paralympic wheelchair curling history. The program’s high-water mark was a fourth-place finish in 2010, and it is coming off a disappointing last-place run at the Paralympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018. But this particular team seems poised to buck that trend.

After missing the 2020 world championships, the team won its way into the 2021 tournament by winning the 2021 World-B championship, the first time a U.S. team had ever won. Then at worlds, the U.S. made the playoffs and finished fourth overall, equaling its best finish since winning bronze in 2008, officially qualifying the country for Beijing. For Emt, who has been on the national team longer than anyone and is its only returning Paralympian, he knows what the team is capable of.

“We could be the best in the world,” he said in advance of the world championships. “If we keep doing what we’re doing and staying the same course with a commitment to each other and to the program, we can be the best team in the world.”

Here’s a closer look at the 2022 Paralympic team.

Matthew Thums competes against Team Sweden during the 2021 World Wheelchair Curling Championship on Oct. 27, 2021 in Beijing, China.

Thums’ journey to Paralympic skip began in 2012 when he attended a “learn to curl” session at his local club in Wausau, Wisconsin, near his hometown of Weston. Thums was hooked, and by 2016 was a U.S. Open champion. The 45-year-old accountant by day first competed at the world championships in 2019 at third with Emt as skip. He then was skip for the 2021 World-B title and at the 2021 worlds.

Stephen Emt (L), Oyuna Uranchimeg (C) and David Samsa (R) high five as they compete against team Latvia during the 2021 World Wheelchair Curling Championship on Oct. 27, 2021 in Beijing, China.

Emt’s athletic career goes way back to the early 1990s when he played basketball for legendary coach Jim Calhoun at UConn. A 1995 car accident brought an end to his basketball career but Emt remained active in sports, including handcycling the 2010 New York City Marathon and coaching high school basketball. Emt discovered curling upon a chance 2014 meeting with U.S. coach Tony Colacchio outside a pie shop in Massachusetts. In the years since the 51-year-old from Hebron, Connecticut, has competed at five world championships and at the 2018 Paralympic Winter Games.

Like Thums a Wisconsin native, the 56-year-old Samsa from Green Bay began curling in 2010. What started as a way to pass time with friends during the winters ended up taking him to the Paralympic Games. Samsa played in his first world championships in 2019 and has been with the national team ever since.

Batoyun “Oyuna” Uranchimeg was born and raised in Mongolia, and was only just visiting Minnesota in 2000 when she was in a car accident that paralyzed her below the waist. The injury meant staying in Minnesota, away from her then-6-year-old son, who couldn’t come to the U.S. for another eight years. Meanwhile, she built her career in the Twin Cities, currently working at the University of St. Thomas, and took up curling in 2016 having never heard of the sport before. The 48-year-old made her world championship debut in 2021.

Pam Wilson celebrates a win against Team Canada that put them through to the semi-finals during the 2021 World Wheelchair Curling Championship on Oct. 29, 2021 in Beijing, China.

Wilson was simply looking for a new sport to challenge her in 2010 when she came upon curling. The 66-year-old physician had competed in all sorts of different sports in her life and had even been a national skiing champion. The Denver native began training out of the Denver Curling Club and by 2019 made her world championship debut for the U.S. team at lead.

Todd Kortemeier is a sportswriter, editor and children’s book author from Minneapolis. He is a contributor to TeamUSA.org on behalf of Red Line Editorial, Inc.

Winter Weather Advisory Issued For Most Of CT On Christmas

Town-by-town snow totals have been released by the National Weather Service for the Christmas Eve storm. More wintry weather is on the way. CONNECTICUT — It was nice to see some festive light snow on the ground on Christmas Eve as some places saw three inches of accumulation.The next storm system arrives late Friday and continues in the morning hours of Christmas. A winter weather advisory is in effect for all of Connecticut except along the immediate coast where just plain rain is forecast.In Hartford, Tolland a...

Town-by-town snow totals have been released by the National Weather Service for the Christmas Eve storm. More wintry weather is on the way.

CONNECTICUT — It was nice to see some festive light snow on the ground on Christmas Eve as some places saw three inches of accumulation.

The next storm system arrives late Friday and continues in the morning hours of Christmas. A winter weather advisory is in effect for all of Connecticut except along the immediate coast where just plain rain is forecast.

In Hartford, Tolland and Windham counties, the weather service issued an advisory from 1 a.m. until 10 a.m. Christmas Day. "Mixed precipitation expected. Total snow accumulations of up to one inch and ice accumulations of up to one tenth of an inch."

A winter weather advisory has been issued for inland sections of southern Connecticut from 10 p.m. Friday until 9 a.m. Christmas morning. "Freezing rain expected. Total ice accumulations of a light glaze to a few hundredths of an inch."

And in Litchfield County, a winter weather advisory is in effect from 10 p.m. Friday until 10 a.m. Saturday. "Freezing rain expected. Total ice accumulations of a light glaze to around one tenth of an inch."

Along the Interstate 95 corridor, rain is expected around midnight and rain is forecast for much of Christmas Day. Up to a half-inch of plain rain is forecast.

The weather is much better on Sunday with sunshine and temperatures around 45 degrees. It looks like rain is forecast for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Here are the town-by-town snow totals as recorded by the National Weather Service:

Fairfield County

Middlesex County

New Haven County

New London County

HARTFORD COUNTY

TOLLAND COUNTY

WINDHAM COUNTY

The Connecticut Department of Public Health has announced the holiday hours of operation for its roster of state-sponsored COVID-19 testing sites.

All State of Connecticut sponsored testing locations are drive-through and/or walk up and no appointment is needed. Additionally, although patients will be asked for insurance information, there is no cost or out-of-pocket expense for a COVID-19 test at all state-sponsored locations.

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, cough, fatigue, sore throat, congestion and new loss of taste or smell. You should seek immediate medical attention if you have any of the following: trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, confusion, or inability to wake or stay awake. There are approximately 400 COVID-19 testing sites throughout Connecticut. Information and specifics about each location—including hours of operation, whether an appointment is needed and whether the site offers pediatric testing— is easily accessible by calling 211 or visiting www.211ct.org.

Bridgeport

Bristol

Colchester (Chatham Health District)

Danbury

East Haddam (Chatham Health District)

Griswold (UNCAS Health District)

Hartford

Hebron (Chatham Health District)

Kent (Torrington Health District)

Killingly

Meriden

Middletown

New Britain

New Haven

Norwalk

Norwich (UNCAS Health District)

Plainfield/Sterling

Stamford

Stonington (Ledge Light Health District)

Waterbury

Waterford (Ledge Light Health District)

Willimantic/Windham

Build winter fairy houses at Deep River County Park

Parents looking for something for their children to do in January may want to sign them up for a seasonal program outside in Hobart.Lake County Parks & Rec presents Winter Fairy Houses: Deep River, which includes a short hike through the trails and building structures with natural materials, on Jan. 22 at Deep River County Park. Attendees should dress for the weather.“It gets kids out of the house. It’s fun to go play in the woods. Hopefully there’s snow,” said Caryn Corriere, program leader for Wint...

Parents looking for something for their children to do in January may want to sign them up for a seasonal program outside in Hobart.

Lake County Parks & Rec presents Winter Fairy Houses: Deep River, which includes a short hike through the trails and building structures with natural materials, on Jan. 22 at Deep River County Park. Attendees should dress for the weather.

“It gets kids out of the house. It’s fun to go play in the woods. Hopefully there’s snow,” said Caryn Corriere, program leader for Winter Fairy Houses: Deep River.

“Kids are not going out on recess at school. Even home-schooled students may not be doing much outside. It’s a good time to get out and have something fun to do.

“Then Mom and Dad could send them out in the backyard and say, ‘Hey, you can make your own fairy house.’ Who knows what they might do?”

Winter Fairy Houses: Deep River offers not only a chance to do something outdoors but also provides some education about the environment.

“It’s a kid’s chance to tinker and we use natural items to build their fairy houses,” said Corriere, an ecologist with Lake County Parks & Rec who works out of Gibson Woods Nature Preserve in Hammond.

“They can build with anything they find out in the woods. Some kids use leaves. They use sticks. I bring evergreen needles in the wintertime. They can pick where they want to build it. We go off-trail.”

“Depending on what kids know about fairies, they’re the keepers of the woods. We want to be good stewards. We’re leaving something for them and try to leave it better than when we got there.

“We’re getting kids to go outside and connect but also getting them to understand that sometimes we have to help out nature and take care of it and respect it.”

“Then they go at it and they can build for as long as they want. I have participants from 3 all the way up to teenagers and adults participating especially with littler guys. The idea is it stays there and they can either go back and check on it and repair it or they can just leave it to go back to nature.

“The houses could be for fairies or others. Depending on how big they make the houses, it could be for a mouse or a raccoon.”

According to Corriere, “big, open spaces” make Deep River County Park a good spot for the latest installment of the Fairy Houses program, which started in 2019 and takes place both in the winter and spring at various Lake County Parks & Rec locations.

“It’s a pretty popular park. We actually get a bunch of people from Porter County. We get people from Valparaiso and Chesterton because it’s so close to the county line,” she said.

Winter Fairy Houses: Oak Ridge Prairie is scheduled from 9:30-11 a.m. Feb. 21 at Oak Ridge Prairie, 301 S. Colfax St., Griffith. Winter Fairy Houses: Stoney Run is slated for 1-2:30 p.m. Feb. 21 at Stoney Run, 9230 E. 142nd Ave., Hebron.

Upcoming programs at Gibson Woods Nature Preserve, 6201 Parrish Ave., include Wanted: Nature Explorers! Fire Basics from 10-11 a.m. Jan. 15, Gibson Woods Nature Journal Club Meeting from 10-11:30 a.m. Jan. 23, and Wanted: Nature Explorers! Winter Scene Investigation from 10-11 a.m. Jan. 29.

How Much Snow Did You Get? A Look At Totals Throughout Region

Much of the region saw the first significant snowfall of the season from a fast-moving winter storm that swept through the region overnight Thursday, Jan. 6 into Friday, Jan. 7.Here are some totals from the National Weather Service and other reports. If you don't see your hometown, leave the total by posting a comment below.New YorkNew York CityCentral Park, 5.5 inchesNassau CountyEast Williston, 8 inchesElmont, 6.6 inchesJericho, 7.1 i...

Much of the region saw the first significant snowfall of the season from a fast-moving winter storm that swept through the region overnight Thursday, Jan. 6 into Friday, Jan. 7.

Here are some totals from the National Weather Service and other reports. If you don't see your hometown, leave the total by posting a comment below.

New York

New York City

Central Park, 5.5 inches

Nassau County

East Williston, 8 inches

Elmont, 6.6 inches

Jericho, 7.1 inches

Massapequa, 7 inches

Syosset, 8.3 inches

Suffolk County

Islip Airport, 5.6 inches

Manorville, 6 inches

Northport, 6.5 inches

Sayville, 7 inches

Shirley, 7 inches

Westchester County

Armonk, 5 inches

Mamaroneck, 7 inches

Port Chester, 8 inches

White Plains, 6 inches

Yonkers, 6 inches

Yorktown Heights, 5 inches

Putnam County

Brewster, 6 inches

Mahopac, 5 inches

Putnam Valley, 4 inches

Dutchess County

Wappingers Falls, 2.5 inches

Orange County

Monroe, 3 inches

Rockland County

New City, 3.5 inches

Stony Point, 3 inches

Sullivan County

Neversink, inches

Ulster County

3.4 Wallkill, inches

Connecticut

Fairfield County

Bridgeport, 8.2 inches

Fairfield, 8 inches

Newtown, 8.1 inches

New Canaan, 8.6 inches

Norwalk, 8.5 inches

Stratford, 7 inches

Hartford County

Glastonbury, 8.5 inches

Rocky Hill, 8 inches

West Hartford, 8.5 inches

Litchfield County

Torrington, inches

Middlesex County

Cromwell, 9 inches

Higganum, 11 inches

Middletown, 9 inches

New Haven County

Ansonia, 9.5 inches

Branford, 9 inches

North Haven, 10.5 inches

Tolland County

Hebron, 12 inches

Storrs, 12 inches

Andover, 10 inches

Windham County

Danielson, 12.8 inches

Pomfret, 12.7 inches

Killingly, 10.0 inches

Scotland, 10.0 inches

Massachusetts

Franklin County

Greenfield, 1.5 inches

Hampden

Holland, 6 inches

Ludlow, 4.5 inches

Hampshire

East Hampton, 2.5 inches

Worcester

Douglas, 10.8 inches

Upton, 10.5 inches

Mendon, 10.2 inches

Webster, 10 inches

Click here to sign up for Daily Voice's free daily emails and news alerts.

Boys basketball leaders for Northwest Indiana

Points: Reece Marrs, Hebron 9-198-22.0; Trey Steinhilber, Boone Grove 8-174-21.8; Brandon Trilli, Munster 6-126-21.0; Ladaion Barnes, Morton 8-163-20.4; Ashton Williamson, 21st Century 8-149-18.6; Amari Northcutt, Morton 8-147-18.4; AJ Lux, Crown Point 10-180-18.0; Cam Webster, Kankakee Valley 9-159-17.7; Ahmad Artis, Bishop Noll 7-121-17.3; Grant Ott-Large, LaPorte 5-84-16.8; Kamari Slaughter, Portage 7-117-16.7; Drew Adzia, Crown Point 10-163-16.3; Romeo Guerra, Lake Station 8-130-16.3; Mason Jones, Valparaiso 11-178-16.2; Willie Mi...

Points: Reece Marrs, Hebron 9-198-22.0; Trey Steinhilber, Boone Grove 8-174-21.8; Brandon Trilli, Munster 6-126-21.0; Ladaion Barnes, Morton 8-163-20.4; Ashton Williamson, 21st Century 8-149-18.6; Amari Northcutt, Morton 8-147-18.4; AJ Lux, Crown Point 10-180-18.0; Cam Webster, Kankakee Valley 9-159-17.7; Ahmad Artis, Bishop Noll 7-121-17.3; Grant Ott-Large, LaPorte 5-84-16.8; Kamari Slaughter, Portage 7-117-16.7; Drew Adzia, Crown Point 10-163-16.3; Romeo Guerra, Lake Station 8-130-16.3; Mason Jones, Valparaiso 11-178-16.2; Willie Miller, Lake Station 8-129-16.1; Kaden Manna, Marquette 8-127-15.9; Quintin Floyd, 21st Century 8-120-15.0; Eric Martin, Calumet 7-105-15.0; Joe Vick, Kouts 7-102-14.6; Jason Kobe, Marquette 8-113-14.1; Adam Eastland, Lake Station 8-110-13.8; DJ Moss, 21st Century 8-109-13.6; Aaron Ketchmark, Kouts 7-92-13.1; Nick Mikash, Kankakee Valley 5-65-13.0; Kyle Kirkham, LaPorte 5-64-12.8; Luke VanEssen, Illiana Christian 10-127-12.7; Griffin Moore, Hebron 9-113-12.6; Miki Djankovich, Hobart 8-98-12.3; Brandon Escobedo, Lake Central 8-98-12.3; Nicholas Holden, Hanover Central 6-73-12.2; Ian Grieger, Morgan Township 7-84-12.0; Sean Kimble, Munster 6-72-12.0; River Halsey, Wheeler 6-72-12.0; Keith Mullins, Hobart 7-83-11.9; Luke Andree, Kankakee Valley 7-82-11.7; Armoni Gonzalez, Lake Station 8-93-11.6; Lukas Balling, Marquette 8-93-11.6; Connor Melchi, Boone Grove 8-91-11.4; Evan Gagnon, North Newton 6-67-11.2; Nick Steele, Highland 11-121-11.0; Xavier Bradley, EC Central 5-54-10.8; Michael Levy, North Newton 6-65-10.8; Travis Randolph, River Forest 8-86-10.8; Kadyn Rowland, North Newton 6-63-10.5; Jaiden Clayton, Lake Central 8-83-10.4; Andrew Murray, Boone Grove 8-83-10.4; Erick Allen, Calumet 7-73-10.4; Chase Kuzma, Hanover Central 6-6-62-10.3; Keagen Holder, Morgan Township 6-61-10.2; David Cundiff, Munster 6-61-10.2; Breece Walls, Valparaiso 11-109-9.9; Cole Hernandez, Hanover Central 6-58-9.7; Luke Zorich, Whiting 9-82-9.1; Terrell Craft, Portage 5-45-9.0.

Rebounds: Quintin Floyd, 21st Century 8-102-12.8; Kaden Manna, Marquette 8-94-11.8; Eric Martin, Calumet 7-82-11.7; Eric Price Jr., 21st Century 8-90-11.3; Aaron Ketchmark, Kouts 7-72-10.3; Grant Ott-Large, LaPorte 5-48-9.8; Brandon Trilli, Munster 6-58-9.7; Willie Miller, Lake Station 8-68-8.5; Ashton Williamson, 21st Century 8-65-8.1; Ladaion Barnes, Morton 8-65-8.1; Jalen Bullock, Calumet 6-48-8.0; Lukas Balling, Marquette 8-62-7.8; DJ Moss, 21st Century 8-61-7.6; Brandon Escobedo, Lake Central 8-61-7.6; Andrew Murray, Boone Grove 8-61-7.6; Roy Cast, 21st Century 6-45-7.5; Nick Mikash, Kankakee Valley 5-37-7.4; Joe Vick, Kouts 7-51-7.3; Ethan Knopf, Lake Central 5-35-7.0; Kamari Slaughter, Portage 7-49-7.0; Keith Mullins, Hobart 7-46-6.6; Hayden Dase, Kankakee Valley 9-56-6.2; Logan Zacarias, Hebron 9-55-6.1; Michael Levy, North Newton 6-36-6.0; Mason Jones, Valparaiso 11-66-6.0; Armoni Gonzalez, Lake Station 8-46-5.8; Tommy Samuelson, LaPorte 5-28-5.6; Evan Gagnon, North Newton 6-32-5.3; Travis Randolph, River Forest 8-42-5.3; Dominique Murphy, EC Central 5-26-5.2; Nicholas Holden, Hanover Central 6-31-5.2; Keegan Holder, Morgan Township 6-31-5.2; Dennis Hurn, River Forest 5-26-5.2; Walter Glover Jr., Highland 11-56-5.1; Miki Djankovich, Hobart 8-41-5.1; Ian Grieger, Morgan Township 7-36-5.1; Malik Hubbard, Calumet 7-34-4.9; Garrick Patten, 21st Century 6-29-4.8; Chase Kuzma, Hanover Central 6-29-4.8; Sean Kimble, Munster 6-29-4.8; Terrell Craft, Portage 5-24-4.8; Landen Hale, Hebron 9-42-4.7; Jaydon Hence, Hobart 6-28-4.7; Luke VanEssen, Illiana Christian 10-47-4.7; Nehemiah Parrish, Wheeler 7-33-4.7; Nolan Toth, Whiting 7-33-4.7; Adam Gibson, Illiana Christian 10-46-4.6; Romeo Guerra, Lake Station 8-37-4.6; Evan Cizewski, LaPorte 5-23-4.6.

Assists: Ashton Williamson, 21st Century 8-79-9.9; Breece Walls, Valparaiso 11-64-5.9; Trey Steinhilber, Boone Grove 8-45-5.6; Erick Allen, Calumet 7-38-5.4; Willie Miller, Lake Station 8-40-5.0; Nolan Toth, Whiting 7-32-4.6; Griffin Moore, Hebron 9-39-4.3; David Cundiff, Munster 6-25-4.2; Drew Adzia, Crown Point 10-40-4.0; Noah Ehrlich, Hobart 8-38-3.8; Luke Andree, Kankakee Valley 7-23-3.3; Johnny Alford, Bishop Noll 5-16-3.2; Nick Steele, Highland 11-35-3.2; Kyle Kirkham, LaPorte 5-16-3.2; Cam Webster, Kankakee Valley 9-27-3.0; Tristin Ballas, Kouts 7-21-3.0; Myles Yekich, Lake Central 8-24-3.0; Kadyn Rowland, North Newton 6-18-3.0; Reece Marrs, Hebron 9-26-2.9; Mason Jones, Valparaiso 11-31-2.9; Japheth Anweiler, Kouts 6-17-2.8; Adam Eastland, Lake Station 8-22-2.8; Evan Gagnon, North Newton 6-17-2.8; Jaydon Hence, Hobart 6-16-2.7; Hayden Dase, Kankakee Valley 9-24-2.7; Aaron Ketchmark, Kouts 7-19-2.7; Kamari Slaughter, Portage 7-19-2.7; Josh Austgen, Hanover Central 5-13-2.6; Nick Mikash, Kankakee Valley 5-13-2.6; AJ Lux, Crown Point 10-25-2.5; Maurion Turks, Lake Station 8-20-2.5; Kaden Manna, Marquette 8-20-2.5; Ahmad Artis, Bishop Noll 7-17-2.4; Riley Blank, Hebron 9-22-2.4; Malik Corley, LaPorte 5-12-2.4; Nicholas Holden, Hanover Central 6-14-2.3; Romeo Guerra, Lake Station 8-18-2.3; Primitivo del Valle, Portage 7-16-2.3; Jalen Lewis, Wheeler 8-18-2.3; Tyler Barker, Illiana Christian 10-22-2.2; Joe Vick, Kouts 7-15-2.2; Yaw Awuah, Munster 6-13-2.2; Mason Bills, Boone Grove 8-17-2.1; Armoni Gonzalez, Lake Station 8-17-2.1; Jarrod Benkovich, Boone Grove 8-16-2.0; Carter Delich, Crown Point 10-20-2.0; Gary Lewis, Marquette 8-16-2.0; Keegan Holder, Morgan Township 6-12-2.0; Connor Melchi, Boone Grove 8-15-1.9; Joshua Tejeda, Hobart 8-15-1.9; Blaine Dalton, Valparaiso 11-21-1.9.

Steals: Armoni Gonzalez, Lake Station 8-31-3.9; Breece Walls, Valparaiso 11-43-3.9; Ashton Williamson, 21st Century 8-28-3.5; David Cundiff, Munster 6-21-3.5; Willie Miller, Lake Station 8-27-3.4; Amari Northcutt, Morton 8-23-2.9; Romeo Guerra, Lake Station 8-22-2.8; Greyson Lemmons, Morgan Township 7-18-2.6; Jaydon Hence, Hobart 6-15-2.5; Ladaion Barnes, Morton 8-20-2.5; Ahmad Artis, Bishop Noll 7-17-2.4; Aaron Ketchmark, Kouts 7-17-2.4; Trey Steinhilber, Boone Grove 8-18-2.3; Erick Allen, Calumet 7-16-2.3; Zeke VanEssen, Illiana Christian 10-23-2.3; Tyler Barker, Illiana Christian 10-22-2.2; Kyle Kirkham, LaPorte 5-11-2.2; Evan Gagnon, North Newton 6-13-2.2; Mason Jones, Valparaiso 11-24-2.2; Luke VanEssen, Illiana Christian 10-21-2.1; Mason Bills, Boone Grove 8-16-2.0; Noah Ehrlich, Hobart 8-16-2.0; Kevin Corcoran, Illiana Christian 9-18-2.0; Adam Walters, Illiana Christian 10-20-2.0; Luke Andree, Kankakee Valley 7-14-2.0; Nick Mikash, Kankakee Valley 5-10-2.0; Nolan Toth, Whiting 7-14-2.0; Riley Blank, Hebron 9-17-1.9; DJ Moss, 21st Century 8-14-1.8; Cam Webster, Kankakee Valley 9-16-1.8.

3-pointers made: AJ Lux, Crown Point 38; Reece Marrs, Hebron 27; Drew Adzia, Crown Point 26; Luke VanEssen, Illiana Christian 19; Cam Webster, Kankakee Valley 19; Mitch Milausnic, Lake Central 15; Luke Zorich, Whiting 15; Ashton Williamson, 21st Century 14; Cole Hernandez, Hanover Central 14; Amari Northcutt, Morton 14; Trey Steinhilber, Boone Grove 13; Jacob Viehman, Lowell 13; Adler Hazlett, Valparaiso 13; DJ Moss, 21st Century 12; Connor Melchi, Boone Grove 12; Kenneth Grant, Hammond Central 12; Griffin Moore, Hebron 12; Zach Wunsh, Lowell 12; Keystin Gunter, River Forest 12; Blaine Dalton, Valparaiso 12; Matthew Klocek, Bishop Noll 11; Scott Flores, Calumet 11; Nicholas Holden, Hanover Central 11; Aerik Tanis, Highland 11; Jamie Hodges Jr., Michigan City 11; Ladaion Barnes, Morton 11; Kamari Slaughter, Portage 11; Jack Smiley, Valparaiso 11; River Halsey, Wheeler 11; Kristijan Zekavica, Highland 10; Primitivo Del Valle, Portage 10; Nolan Toth, Whiting 10; Willie Miller, Lake Station 9; Kyle Kirkham, LaPorte 9; Kobe Galligan, River Forest 9; Michael Flynn, Valparaiso 9; Matthew King, Hammond Central 8; Rico Maldonado, Highland 8; Luke Andree, Kankakee Valley 8; Romeo Guerra, Lake Station 8; Logan Krambeck, Lowell 8; Jason Kobe, Marquette 8; Lukas Balling, Marquette 8; David Cundiff, Munster 8; Ahmad Artis, Bishop Noll 7; Xavier Bradley, EC Central 7; Allen Resendez, Griffith 7; Jaydon Hence, Hobart 7; Tyler Barker, Illiana Christian 7; Adam Gibson, Illiana Christian 7; Andy Spoelman, Illiana Christian 7; Brett Spain, Lake Central 7; Malik Corley, LaPorte 7; Brandon Welch, Marquette 7; Mason Jones, Valparaiso 7; Cameron Andrews, Washington Township 7; Brady Rife, Wheeler 7.

Free-throw percentage: Tristan Ballas, Kouts 19-20-95%; Mason Bills, Boone Grove 14-15-93%; Drew Adzia, Crown Point 37-40-93%; Andrew Murray, Boone Grove 23-25-92%; Peyton Fase, Covenant Christian 12-12-92%; Jack Smiley, Valparaiso 11-12-92%; River Halsey, Wheeler 11-12-92%; Trey Steinhilber, Boone Grove 39-43-91%; Garrick Patten, 21st Century 9-10-90%; Xavier Bradley, EC Central 9-10-90%; Mitch Milausnic, Lake Central 14-16-88%; Breece Walls, Valparaiso 36-41-88%; Ahmad Artis, Bishop Noll 16-19-84%; Cam Webster, Kankakee Valley 26-31-84%; Tyler Barker, Illiana Christian 19-23-83%; Ian Grieger, Morgan Township 20-24-83%; David Cundiff, Munster 15-18-83%; Nolan Kinsella, Munster 10-12-83%; Reece Marrs, Hebron 31-38-82%; Keagen Holder, Morgan Township 14-17-82%; Nate King, Morton 14-17-82%; Amari Northcutt, Morton 9-11-82%; Connor Croff, Kouts 13-16-81%; Josh Austgen, Hanover Central 8-10-80%; Nicholas Holden, Hanover Central 8-10-80%; Darryl Mosley, Lake Station 8-10-80%; Carter Delich, Crown Point 11-14-79%; Allen Resendez, Griffith 11-14-79%; Rico Maldonado, Highland 11-14-79%; Jason Kobe, Marquette 27-34-79%; Mason Jones, Valparaiso 27-34-79%; Adam Gibson, Illiana Christian 14-18-78%; Jamie Hodges Jr., Michigan City 18-23-78%; Derrick Brooks, Valparaiso 10-13-77%; Jaydon Hence, Hobart 9-12-75%; Jaiden Clayton, Lake Central 17-23-74%; Jacob Miller, Covenant Christian 16-22-73%; Vince Yzaguirre, Lake Station 16-22-73%; Willie Miller, Lake Station 30-42-71%; Ladaion Barnes, Morton 10-14-71%; Jared Benkovich, Boone Grove 7-10-70%; Jackson Peeler, Hebron 7-10-70%; AJ Lux, Crown Point 24-35-69%; Lou Mureiko, Crown Point 9-13-69%; Ethan Knopf, Lake Central 9-13-69%; Brady Rife, Wheeler 9-13-69%; Jed Huffman, Whiting 18-26-69%.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.