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Home Care in Farmington, CT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that’s how it should be – a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren’t able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today’s world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That’s where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in Farmington, CT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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What Our Clients Are Saying

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients’ lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a “one size fits all” approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life’s little moments – where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can’t quite keep up with life’s daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in Farmington, CT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in Farmington, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliché, it’s especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

Types of In-home Care in Farmington, CT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior’s daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in Farmington, CT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client’s individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor’s appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior’s needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it’s true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior’s home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home’s emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior’s home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Farmington, CT, seniors don’t have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors’ health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors’ quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom – much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it’s usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

With Always Best Care’s home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Farmington, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you’re worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran’s Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior’s private insurance plan. Read over your loved one’s insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver’s role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors’ minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Farmington,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior’s day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in Farmington

Girls basketball top performances thus far and games to watch

Claudia Schneider, Pomperaug: Schneider earned the Tournament MVP at North Haven’s Fred Kelly Memorial Holiday Tournament with 16 points, 7 steals, 6 rebounds and 5 assists in 53-42 win over Coginchaug and 24 points, 7 rebounds, 5 assists 4 steals and 4 blocks in the final against North Haven.Lilly Ferguson, Newington: The senior helped Newington to the Ridgefield Holiday Tournament title by averaging 20 points and 7 rebounds in the two games for the new No. 1 team in the GameTimeCT Poll....

Claudia Schneider, Pomperaug: Schneider earned the Tournament MVP at North Haven’s Fred Kelly Memorial Holiday Tournament with 16 points, 7 steals, 6 rebounds and 5 assists in 53-42 win over Coginchaug and 24 points, 7 rebounds, 5 assists 4 steals and 4 blocks in the final against North Haven.

Lilly Ferguson, Newington: The senior helped Newington to the Ridgefield Holiday Tournament title by averaging 20 points and 7 rebounds in the two games for the new No. 1 team in the GameTimeCT Poll.

Meghan Kirck, Sacred Heart Academy: The sophomore started the game on the bench but came in to hit 9 3-pointers on her way to 27 points in an 80-37 win over Shelton.

Kenzie Sirowich, Seymour: The senior was on fire with 31 points, 10 rebounds, 6 assists and 6 steals in a 69-23 win over Crosby and 21 points, 13 rebounds, 5 assists and 3 steals in a 47-43 loss to Woodland.

Jordan Dion, Suffield: Dion impressed this week with 24 points including 4 3s, 5 steals, 6 rebound and 6 assists against Ellington and 10 points, 5 assists and 4 steals against Bacon Academy.

Madison Lockery, Stamford: Lockery had 16 points (shooting 4-for-6 from 3) in a win over Kolbe. She also was 2-for-4 from 3 and had 11 points in a win over Clarkstown North (NY).

Adalyse Gonzalez, Windham: Gonzalez scored 53 points in two games including a 36-point effort with 10 3s in a 74-38 win over Windham Tech.

Mya Zaccagnini, Holy Cross: The junior point guard poured in 29 points as Holy Cross beat Woodland 66-31.

Emma Gentry, Trumbull: Gentry scored 17 points, knocking down 3 3-pointers as Trumbull beat Warde 54-32.

Jamie Sacco, Westbrook: Sacco had 21 points including 3 3-pointers along with 7 rebounds, 3 assists, 3 steals and 4 blocks in 39-31 win over Old Lyme.

Jackie Russell, East Hampton: The sophomore hit 7 3-pointers as part of a 24-point effort in a 44-38 Shoreline Conference win over Cromwell.

Molly Smolenski, Sheehan: Smolenski scored 17 points with 5 3s against Wilbur Cross. She flowed that up with 20 points on 6 3s against Lyman Hall.

Windham at Bacon Academy, Thur. 6 p.m.: Windham is off to a fast start but now steps up in class to take on 6-1 Bacon Academy which is fresh off a victory over New London.

Bristol Eastern at East Hartford, Thur. 6:45 p.m.: It is not often two returning GameTimeCT First-team All-State players face off the following year but that’s what we have hear with MVP Shailyn Pinkney of East Hartford and Ciara Collins of Eastern.

Farmington at RHAM Thur. 6:45 p.m.: The CCC is loaded with top teams, these two would like to be consider among them. A win here is a step in the right direction.

Sacred Heart Academy at Hamden, Thur. 7 p.m.: Separated by less than two miles, both schools won SCC Tournament titles last winter and both will be in the running for the league crown this season.

Cromwell at Valley Regional, Fri. 6 p.m.: The top two teams in the Shoreline Conference get after each other right away to start the new year.

Windsor Locks at Stafford, Fri. 6:45 p.m.: In the top half of the top-heavy NCCC, these two teams both have the chance to be league champions.

Hand at Mercy, Fri. 7 p.m.: Two of the SCC’s best players square off in Sophie Hedge of Mercy and Sophia Coppola of hand.

Stamford at St. Joseph, Sat. 2 p.m.: Both teams came into the season with high hopes and both promptly lost their openers. Fortunately, both were able to right the ship since and now focus on their FCIAC schedules.

Newington at Trumbull, Sat. 6:30 p.m.: Newington beat Ridgefield and now brings its No. 1 ranking in the GameTimeCT Poll and its 23-game winning streak on the road to Trumbull for another matchup against one of the FCIAC’s best teams.

GameTimeCT Top 10 Hockey Poll (Jan. 9): New Canaan remains No. 1

After a sad and dark couple of nights for the state hockey community (and beyond), teams got back on the ice Saturday, everybody honoring the late Teddy Balkind, St. Luke's sophomore, in their own ways. Amid all that, it felt sort of odd to ask 11 other voters to put 10 teams in order on Friday.But when the points added up, Balkind's hometown high school remained on top: New Canaan is No. 1 in the GameTimeCT Boys Hockey Top 10 Poll for the second week in a row. The Rams played a spirited tie with Ridgefield on Saturday night after the...

After a sad and dark couple of nights for the state hockey community (and beyond), teams got back on the ice Saturday, everybody honoring the late Teddy Balkind, St. Luke's sophomore, in their own ways. Amid all that, it felt sort of odd to ask 11 other voters to put 10 teams in order on Friday.

But when the points added up, Balkind's hometown high school remained on top: New Canaan is No. 1 in the GameTimeCT Boys Hockey Top 10 Poll for the second week in a row. The Rams played a spirited tie with Ridgefield on Saturday night after their own ceremony, scoring the tying goal in the last minute.

The other nine teams remained the same with a lot of internal movement. Notre Dame-West Haven hopped up to No. 2 after a 5-2 win over Fairfield Prep, which dropped from third to fifth. Notre Dame picked up the three first-place votes that didn't go to New Canaan. Darien, which had received three first-place votes last week, slipped behind the Green Knights into third, and Ridgefield jumped to fourth.

That means Wednesday's New Canaan-Darien showdown, the first of two for the neighborly rivals, won't be a No. 1 vs. No. 2 matchup, but it'll no doubt still have plenty of juice.

Nos. 6-8 remained intact: Fairfield, Xavier, Northwest Catholic. But Hamden, fresh off wins over Hand and West Haven, narrowly leapfrogged Greenwich into ninth.

Six other schools picked up some support low on some ballots, including St. Joseph, which picked up its first poll points since early last season after taking Ridgefield and Fairfield to overtime.

The GameTimeCT Top 10 Boys Hockey Poll (Jan. 9)

Last Week: def. Greenwich 7-1; tied Ridgefield 1-1.

This Week: Wednesday vs. Darien (Darien Ice), 4:20 p.m.; Thursday at St. Joseph (Rinks at Shelton), 8 p.m.

The Bottom Line:After an emotional week in town, there'll be a different kind of emotion on Wednesday.

The Bottom Line: Shame there isn't a second ND-New Canaan matchup... at least before March.

Last Week: lost to Bishop Hendricken (R.I.) 3-2; Lost 2-1 to LaSalle (R.I.)

The Bottom Line: A showdown with Notre Dame-West Haven was moved to February, so instead of opening the season with eight games against Connecticut top-10 or Rhode Island elite teams, Darien opens with seven.

The Bottom Line: "A little Jekyll and Hyde," coach Shaun Gallagher said Saturday night, with a young team, but he says they're getting better each game. That New Canaan game was a fun one.

The Bottom Line: Even with a so-so start by Jesuits standards, with one win in the past five, you just expect them to be right there in March. They always seem to be there.

This Week: Monday vs. West Haven (Wonderland), 8:30 p.m.; Wednesday vs. Ridgefield (Wonderland), 8:15 p.m.; Saturday at Trumbull (Rinks at Shelton), 8 p.m.

The Bottom Line: The Mustangs have a few interesting tests over the next few weeks, including this Ridgefield game on Wednesday.

The Bottom Line: After coming from behind to beat the Generals on Saturday, the Lions have only one game scheduled between now and the Farmington Valley rematch on Jan. 26.

Last Week: def. Immaculate 7-3; lost to Barrington (R.I.) 3-2.

The Bottom Line: That one Northwest Catholic game in the next two and a half weeks is against Xavier, which is a little busier. After Wednesday, nine of the Falcons' last 10 in-state opponents received poll votes this week.

The Bottom Line: Division-II Hand played the Green Dragons tough during the week, but they came back strong in the old-school rivalry game. The rare home-and-home this week.

Last Week: lost to New Canaan 7-1; lost to LaSalle (R.I.) 4-2.

The Bottom Line: A game against Bishop Hendricken was canceled out of concern for possible weather conditions Sunday night, coach Jack Duffy said.

Also receiving votes: Lyman Hall (6-1-0) 3; North Haven (4-2-0) 3; St. Joseph (1-4-0) 3; Farmington Valley (5-2-0) 2; Sheehan (6-1-0) 1; Simsbury (2-3-1) 1.

The Following Voted: Media: Erik Dobratz, WTNH-8; Michael Fornabaio, Connecticut Post; Tim Jensen, Patch Media Corp.; Greg Lederer, Meriden Record Journal; Mike Madera, Elm City Newspapers; Dan Nowak, New Haven Register; Pete Paguaga, GameTimeCT; Dave Stewart, New Canaan Advertiser/Darien Times. Coaches: Mac Budd, Darien; Shaun Gallagher, Ridgefield; Matt Sather, Fairfield Prep; Larry Vieira, Notre Dame-West Haven.

Here’s how Connecticut malls plan to fill big box store vacancies

Across Connecticut, hundreds of thousands of square feet formerly occupied by some of the country’s leading department stores stand vacant.The empty space includes a swath of the fourth and fifth floors of Stamford Town Center mall, following the closing last month of a Saks Off 5th department store.As Saks Off 5th and other retail icons have foundered in recent years, malls around the state face dwindling prospects for bringing in big-box retailers. But mall operators said they are not losing hope, as they increasingly l...

Across Connecticut, hundreds of thousands of square feet formerly occupied by some of the country’s leading department stores stand vacant.

The empty space includes a swath of the fourth and fifth floors of Stamford Town Center mall, following the closing last month of a Saks Off 5th department store.

As Saks Off 5th and other retail icons have foundered in recent years, malls around the state face dwindling prospects for bringing in big-box retailers. But mall operators said they are not losing hope, as they increasingly look at non-retail alternatives to help fill the vacancies.

“Although I am not able to disclose a specific tenant at this time, I can tell you that our plans for this space will draw an enormous amount of attention and the community will be thrilled,” Dan Stolzenbach, Stamford Town Center’s general manager, told Hearst Connecticut Media, in response to an inquiry about the mall’s plans for the former Saks Off 5th space.

Large spaces to fill

The departure of Saks Off 5th marked the latest of the numerous closings at Stamford Town Center in the past few years. It opened in June 2015 — taking more than 56,000 square feet in a section of the mall that was previously occupied by a Saks Fifth Avenue store, which closed in 2014.

Hudson’s Bay Co., the owner of Saks Off 5th, decided not to renew the department store’s lease, which expired.

“After careful consideration, Saks Off 5th has decided to close its Stamford location,” Hudson’s Bay said in a statement last September, when it announced the closing. “Through the regular course of business, we continually evaluate store performance and other factors, and, from time to time, may determine it necessary to close a store.”

The Canada-headquartered Hudson’s Bay is also the former owner of Lord + Taylor, whose 1826 founding made it the country’s oldest department-store chain. In August 2020, Lord + Taylor and its parent company filed for bankruptcy, a decision that led to the closing of all 38 of its stores nationwide — including its four establishments in Connecticut.

Lord + Taylor’s stores in Stamford and Trumbull closed last February. The Stamford establishment had operated in an approximately 160,000-square-foot standalone building at 110 High Ridge Road in Stamford. At Westfield Trumbull mall, it had occupied an approximately 117,000-square-foot anchor space since 1992.

“We know that retail will continue to evolve and change in the years ahead,” Stamford Mayor Caroline Simmons said. “As it does, the city of Stamford will offer retailers a vibrant, diverse and growing community in our downtown area and beyond, making us a continued attractive destination for retailers of all types.”

A couple of months earlier, the Lord + Taylor stores had closed at the Danbury Fair and Westfarms malls. The Westfarms establishment, in Farmington, covered about 120,000 square feet and had operated since 1983. The nearly 80,000-square-foot store at Danbury Fair had been in business since 1991.

In recent years, the demise of other retail icons has left behind other gaping holes. Among other prominent vacancies in the state is the approximately 179,000-square-foot box at the Connecticut Post mall in Milford, which is still searching for permanent tenants to succeed the Sears department store that shuttered in early 2019. A few months before the closing at Connecticut Post, Sears filed for bankruptcy and announced plans to close more than 140 Sears and Kmart stores nationwide.

“The same factors that impact department stores across the country are at play here in Milford, with the reality being that the majority of retailers opening physical stores are opting for smaller formats than the traditional ‘big-box’ anchor format,” said Jon Meshel, vice president of development at Centennial, which owns Connecticut Post. “Because of this shift, we envision a multi-use transformation of the space that will breathe life into the center and make it a great place for the community at large to live, work, dine, shop and entertain.”

Thinking beyond retail

Amid the longstanding headwinds facing brick-and-mortar retailers, there is a strong possibility that some non-retail tenants could eventually move into the vacant big boxes.

In total, the anchor space where Saks Off 5th operated at Stamford Town Center covers about 78,000 square feet — factoring in about 20,000 square feet that was not used by Saks Off 5th, in addition to the area where the department store operated.

While Hudson’s Bay sold Lord + Taylor to rental-clothing company Le Tote in 2019, it has kept the properties that housed the Lord + Taylor stores in its real estate portfolio through ownership and ground-lease arrangements.

Asked by Hearst Connecticut Media about its plans for the former Lord + Taylor sites, Hudson’s Bay said in its statement that “Lord & Taylor was a popular destination in many Connecticut communities. We continue to explore opportunities for these locations.” The company did not immediately respond to a follow-up inquiry about its plans.

Spokespersons for Westfarms and Westfield Trumbull referred inquiries about the former Lord + Taylor sites to Hudson’s Bay. Messages left for a spokesperson for Danbury Fair were not returned.

Last year, commercial real estate giant CBRE marketed a “York Factory” office-space concept for the former Lord + Taylor locations in the state. But in response to an inquiry this week from Hearst Connecticut Media, a CBRE spokesperson said the company was no longer involved with any of those properties. The company declined to comment on the reasons for ending its involvement.

At Connecticut Post, Centennial officials are considering a number of options for the former Sears space.

“We have proven success in other markets redeveloping spaces like this into mixed-use projects that have included residential, entertainment, dining, health-and-wellness and park-plaza space among other diverse offerings,” Meshel said. “And we envision doing something similar with the former Sears space.”

When she was running for mayor last year, Simmons expressed interest in seeing Stamford Town Center explore non-retail alternatives to help fill its vacancies. Among the recent arrivals at the mall is A Dance Space, a dance studio that has taken over an approximately 5,000 square-foot section of the shopping center’s fifth level that was previously occupied by retailers such as an Ann Taylor clothing store.

“Retailers across the country will continue to make decisions about their individual operations and footprint, especially as they work their way out of the pandemic,” Simmons said. “Thankfully, Stamford Town Center brought in new tenants during 2021 and has more lined up for this year. We’ll continue to support them as an important partner in our local economy as they work to fill the space being vacated by Saks Off 5th.”

[email protected]; twitter: @paulschott

Horizon Technology Finance Leads $30 Million Venture Loan Facility to Leading D2C Custom Furniture Business Interior Define

FARMINGTON, Conn., Jan. 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Horizon Technology Finance Corporation (NASDAQ: HRZN) ("Horizon"), a leading specialty finance company that provides capital in the form of secured loans to venture capital backed companies in the technology, life science, heal...

FARMINGTON, Conn., Jan. 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Horizon Technology Finance Corporation (NASDAQ: HRZN) ("Horizon"), a leading specialty finance company that provides capital in the form of secured loans to venture capital backed companies in the technology, life science, healthcare information and services, and sustainability industries, announced today it closed a $30 million venture loan facility to Interior Define, Inc. ("Interior Define"), of which Horizon funded $12.5 million of the initial $20 million draw, and a private investment vehicle managed by Horizon Technology Finance Management LLC, Horizon's advisor, funded $7.5 million.

Interior Define is a leading customizable D2C furniture brand offering thousands of upholstery items as well as dining, lighting, and decor, through both e-commerce and a rapidly expanding brick-and-mortar presence. Its made-to-order production approach offers over 150,000 specific furniture variations, enabling customers to design, personalize, and purchase furniture affordably, allowing the company to design new products more quickly and economically than competitors. The company is backed by a top-tier investor syndicate, including Pritzker Group Venture Capital and Chicago Ventures, and will use the loan proceeds for general growth and working capital purposes.

"Interior Define is redefining online shopping for furniture," said Gerald A. Michaud, President of Horizon. "By providing an immersive, omnichannel shopping environment, including the ability to consult one-on-one with a design specialist, Interior Define has found a sweet spot in creating quality products with a simple and favorable customer experience. We are excited to support Interior Define's continued growth and development."

"We appreciate Horizon's support as we continue to evolve the business, disrupt the D2C experience for customers and open 30 new Define Studio retail stores through 2022," said Antonio Nieves, Chief Executive Officer of Interior Define. "Our highly customizable products and iterative process provide consumers and the professional design community alike with incredible choice and a pleasurable buying experience both in person and online. As a result of Horizon's investment in the business, we are able to pivot our offerings to fit our customers' needs, expanding our product portfolio, positioning us to further expand our market share in the years to come."

About Horizon Technology Finance

Horizon Technology Finance Corporation (NASDAQ: HRZN) is a leading specialty finance company that provides capital in the form of secured loans to venture capital backed companies in the technology, life science, healthcare information and services, and sustainability industries. The investment objective of HRZN is to maximize its investment portfolio's return by generating current income from the debt investments it makes and capital appreciation from the warrants it receives when making such debt investments. Horizon Technology Finance Management LLC is headquartered in Farmington, Connecticut, with a regional office in Pleasanton, California, and investment professionals located in Portland, Maine, Austin, Texas, and Reston, Virginia. To learn more, please visit www.horizontechfinance.com.

About Interior Define

Digitally native and vertically integrated brand, Interior Define, offers the most compelling and in-depth custom furniture experience in the industry. Interior Define's unique, made-to-order production approach enables customization across configuration, size, cushion fill, leg style, and fabric and leather upholstery including Oeko-Tex© Standard Certified, performance and kid- and pet-friendly options. Interior Define's omni channel approach enables customers with personalized support from Design Experts each step of the way, from designing mood boards to offering expert advice on fabric and floor plans, to help bring a design project to life. Democratizing customization fuels the Interior Define vision of providing an experience like no other for each unique living space. Visit Interior Define in Austin, TX, Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA, Charlotte, NC, Chicago, IL, Dallas, TX, Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, San Francisco, CA, Seattle, WA, and Washington, DC. For more information on Interior Define, please visit www.interiordefine.com and follow Interior Define on Instagram @interiordefine.

Forward-Looking Statements

Statements included herein may constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Statements other than statements of historical facts included in this press release may constitute forward-looking statements and are not guarantees of future performance, condition or results and involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, including those described from time to time in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Horizon undertakes no duty to update any forward-looking statement made herein. All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this press release.

Contacts:

Investor Relations:ICRGarrett Edson[email protected] (860) 284-6450

Media Relations:ICRChris Gillick[email protected] (646) 677-1819

SOURCE Horizon Technology Finance Corporation

Will Connecticut restaurants require vaccination? A few do. Many fear the repercussions New York has already seen

When Gov. Ned Lamont introduced the state’s digital vaccine card, he called it a tool businesses can use to keep their employees and customers safe. But as with mask wearing, Lamont declined to make proof of vaccination mandatory, as it is in some places, including New York City.The Connecticut Restaurant Association, which advocates for an industry that is still reeling and vulnerable from the catastrophic effects of the coronavirus pandemic, agrees.“Two words that hurt the industry more than anything are mandates ...

When Gov. Ned Lamont introduced the state’s digital vaccine card, he called it a tool businesses can use to keep their employees and customers safe. But as with mask wearing, Lamont declined to make proof of vaccination mandatory, as it is in some places, including New York City.

The Connecticut Restaurant Association, which advocates for an industry that is still reeling and vulnerable from the catastrophic effects of the coronavirus pandemic, agrees.

“Two words that hurt the industry more than anything are mandates and restrictions,” said Scott Dolch, president and CEO of the CRA. ”New York City has had it for six months, and they haven’t seen a rise in people coming out to eat. More like they’ve seen a rise in hostile fights, shouting matches, challenges. That’s what a mandate does. Just like mask mandates, it puts policing on the restaurant. The last thing you want is a front line hostess, 16, 17, 18 years old, dealing with someone who didn’t get vaccinated and wants to make a scene in a restaurant. … That’s the fear I have.”

Left to decide individually, most restaurants won’t use the state’s digital vaccine card. Bar in New Haven made headlines in August when it began demanding proof of vaccination, with a matching government-issued ID so no one can cheat and use someone else’s card.

That policy still stands at the pizza place-brew pub-dance club. Frank Patrick, who owns Bar, could not be reached for comment.

Only a few restaurants followed suit. Red Stone Pub in Simsbury and Take Tea, the new tea room in Avon, insist all patrons be vaccinated. But both rely on the honor system. Unlike Bar, they don’t demand proof.

Marc Lubetkin owns Red Stone Pub, known for its huge bar selection, pub food and live entertainment. In August, Lubetkin announced his vaccination policy on his Facebook page and a few community chat pages.

The reaction was swift, with some supportive and many angrily opposed. One of the more civil comments was, “I will no longer support this business. You made your decision, and I made mine.” Other comments were so vitriolic, Lubetkin said, that the community pages took down the posts.

Lubetkin doesn’t care. “Four restaurant owners congratulated me and said it was ballsy and a good idea. Another one called and raved, why would I do something so stupid,” he said. “I didn’t do it to be ballsy or political. It just seems like the logical thing to keep myself, my staff, my customers and my family safe.

Lubetkin put a sign outside his restaurant about the policy. He doesn’t worry about not asking for proof. Unvaccinated people are angry and shunning Red Stone, so expecting them to patronize the pub isn’t realistic, he said. And new customers, glad of the policy, are showing up.

“A group of people who had never been there started coming in to show appreciation for what we did. But we lost three couples who used to come in regularly. They didn’t want to get vaccinated,” he said.

Take Tea, which just opened in January, requires online registration to protect against food waste and to limit the clientele to 50% of capacity. The vaccination policy is clearly stated on the restaurant’s website. Nann Thomson, who owns Take Tea, trusts customers to comply.

“As I try to believe the best in everyone, I rely on the word of my guests that they are feeling healthy, have not been recently exposed and are fully vaccinated before they come to tea,” Thomson said. “The feedback I’ve gotten has been only positive, as many people are wary of dining in now. And for many this rule provides another level of comfort regarding their safety.”

Thomson said her policy is grounded in her religious beliefs. “My faith requires that I be vaccinated to guard my health as well as take steps to protect others, so my family and I adhered to the message about the myriad benefits of getting vaccinated,” she said.

Bryce Hardy, owner of The Charles in Wethersfield, said, “For the most part everyone sees the value in what a vaccination can do for you,” and strongly encourages all his employees to be vaccinated. But Hardy does not plan to exclude unvaccinated people.

“I think that our restaurant keeps our customers safe, with hand washing, masks, keeping distances. And I believe everyone does their own due diligence, taking responsibility for themselves to keep others safe,” he said. “I don’t think a vaccine mandate is the answer.”

Billy Grant, who owns Bricco in West Hartford, said, “I am vaxxed and boosted, and I am all for the vaccine, but I don’t think we’re in a position to exclude people who aren’t vaccinated.”

Chris Prosperi, owner of Metro Bis in Simsbury, said, “We have so many other things going on right now. It’s not high on our list of things to think about.”

Prosperi said traffic has dropped off considerably since the holidays, so he can keep customers safe by keeping them apart from each other at his large facility. Beyond that, he thinks customers are smarter now than they were earlier in the pandemic. “People are being very careful about what they are doing,” he said.

Others merely pointed to the lack of a government mandate. John Pepe of Chez Est, the Hartford restaurant and LGBTQ hangout, said he would issue a vaccination mandate “only if required by the city or the state.” Nikki Vinci of J. Timothy’s in Plainville said “we have been following all the appropriate guidelines and will continue to do so.” Heather Loranger of Locals 8 Restaurant Group, which has eight locations in Hartford, Farmington, Glastonbury, Milford, Simsbury, Southington and West Hartford, said, “It’s not mandatory. That’s our reason,” and that no customers are asking for it.

Restaurateurs’ hesitation is understandable. New York City began enforcing vaccine mandates in restaurants in September. Since then, according to a poll by the New York State Restaurant Association, which got 125 responses, most restaurants have experienced negative repercussion.

More than 90% have had customer-facing challenges, such as customers refusing to dine there, hesitating to present proof, canceling events or screaming at employees.

More than 75% have had staff issues, such as workers refusing to get vaccinated and having to be placed on leave and staff being spread too thin to enforce the mandate.

A majority of respondents, 57.6%, reported business worsened significantly. Another 19.2% reported business worsened a little. Less than 7% reported business improving and 16.8% said business was the same.

Like CRA, New York’s restaurant association dislikes mandates. “The mandate is a burden on an industry that cannot bear any more. New York City must find alternatives instead of relying on already taxed business owners and their staffs,” said Melissa Fleischut, president and CEO of NYSRA. “City government should work to support restaurants during this time, not continue to add to their plight.”

Still, others are waiting to see how this infection spike plays out. Zach Shuman, vice president of operations and partner at The Bean Restaurant Group, which includes Union Kitchen and Wurst Haus in West Hartford, said he would comply if the town issued a mandate, but he doesn’t plan to do it now.

“I’m actually kind of shocked that New York City has had it for four or five months and it’s not in West Hartford yet,” Shuman said. “But I think people want to watch how it turns out before making that kind of a decision. Maybe it will go down in the next two or three weeks.”

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