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Home Care in East Hampton, CT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that's how it should be - a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren't able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today's world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in East Hampton, CT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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Home Care East Hampton, CT

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients' lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a "one size fits all" approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life's little moments - where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can't quite keep up with life's daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in East Hampton, CT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in East Hampton, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

 In-Home Care East Hampton, CT

Types of In-home Care in East Hampton, CT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

 Elderly Care East Hampton, CT

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming
 Senior Care East Hampton, CT

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Respite Care East Hampton, CT

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings
 Caregivers East Hampton, CT

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior's daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in East Hampton, CT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

Home Care East Hampton, CT
  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client's individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor's appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior's needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

 In-Home Care East Hampton, CT

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in East Hampton, CT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

 Elderly Care East Hampton, CT

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in East Hampton, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

 Senior Care East Hampton, CT

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran's Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in East Hampton,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in East Hampton, CT

Kalispell one of the fast-growing cities after COVID

Bend, Oregon, is in the middle of nowhere—two-and-a-half hours from Eugene over a mountain pass that can be treacherous even in springtime. And that’s what people like about it.“People were already coming here in hordes, and then it just exploded in the pandemic,” said Lynne McConnell, the city’s housing director. “More would be coming if we had housing to accommodate them.”In states around the country, people who moved early in the pandemic were attracted to wide-open spaces in relativ...

Bend, Oregon, is in the middle of nowhere—two-and-a-half hours from Eugene over a mountain pass that can be treacherous even in springtime. And that’s what people like about it.

“People were already coming here in hordes, and then it just exploded in the pandemic,” said Lynne McConnell, the city’s housing director. “More would be coming if we had housing to accommodate them.”

In states around the country, people who moved early in the pandemic were attracted to wide-open spaces in relatively obscure towns rather than the big cities that had attracted millennials in the previous decade, according to U.S. Census Bureau statistics and Stateline analysis of postal change-of-address data.

The moves may have brought welcome money to smaller towns, but they also raised housing prices and changed the bucolic way of life that attracted residents in the first place. And in the past year, moving patterns largely have reverted to pre-pandemic trends.

Affluent workers who could do their jobs remotely had an easier time moving to far-off areas, especially places like Bend that aren’t commutable. Before the pandemic, people moved mostly for a new job, but since then moves have become more about comfort and lifestyle factors such as good neighborhoods, home ownership, climate and recreation, said Peter Haslag, an assistant finance professor at Vanderbilt University who studied pandemic moves.

The moves also gave a needed boost to bond ratings for remote municipalities, giving them more ability to borrow money for infrastructure projects that can keep them growing, according to another study Haslag co-authored that was published in February by the Georgia Tech Scheller College of Business.

“It becomes relatively less expensive (for growing cities) to take on new projects,” Haslag said. “The evidence suggests that areas that experienced significant inflow during the pandemic should experience relatively greater economic growth.”

Major cities including Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia and San Francisco lost population between 2020 and 2021, according to census estimates, mostly from people moving out.

Where did they go? The postal data suggests they went to some lesser-known places that were more comfortable for remote work, with less crowded conditions.

In Oregon, it was Bend, where net in-moves more than tripled to 1,214 in the first year of the pandemic. Since then, moves have stalled as housing prices have gone through the roof, and the area lost 1,209 net movers in the past year. The city is struggling with tax and labor shortage issues to get new homes built, McConnell said.

“The problem is the people who swing the hammers can’t afford to live here at the wages construction companies can pay,” she said.

Tax increases also are capped by state law, forcing the city to raise fees as expenses rise, another factor that makes it more costly to build on the city’s rocky, volcanic soil. Homes for sale range from $500,000 to millions of dollars.

“That might look affordable to people from the bigger cities in California and Washington. It’s not affordable to people who live here,” McConnell said.

The influx has been good for city finances, though, said Sharon Wojda, the city’s chief financial officer.

New development has helped tax revenue grow, and the city’s Standard & Poor’s bond report noted an “affluent and rapidly growing economy” attracting young professionals.

Newcomers have caused tension with longtime residents, who face impossible homebuying costs and more crowding on scenic mountain and desert trails. A few “Don’t Move Here” bumper stickers have appeared to compete with the standard “Be Nice! You’re in Bend” sentiment on stickers, McConnell said.

Ellen Waterston, who runs workshops and retreats for writers, sold a house in Bend before the pandemic in fall 2019, thinking she’d rent for a few months and look for a smaller place to downsize. No dice in Bend’s pandemic housing market.

“I wound up bidding on countless houses, entering into new construction contracts only for the builder to back out as the price of materials made it impossible,” said Waterston. “I finally got into a house in Bend only because I happened on a for-sale-by-owner (sign).”

Phoenix officials maintain the city is still growing fast. They say the moving statistics may be distorted by college students who didn’t always fill out change-of-address forms when they moved in, and by the fact that ZIP codes don’t accurately describe city boundaries.

“I am comfortable saying Phoenix is going to show significant growth,” said Eric Jay Toll, communications manager for the city’s Community and Economic Development Department.

New York City officials also see better times ahead.

“We have strong evidence that New York City is gaining population,” said Department of City Planning spokesperson Rebecca Weintraub. “U.S. Postal filings suggest migration reverted to pre-pandemic patterns and that many wealthy neighborhoods are seeing an inflow of population.”

Moves out of Manhattan spiked from about 36,000 in the year leading up to March 2020 to more than 100,000 in the following year, but fell back to less than 23,000 the next year, according to the Stateline analysis. In that first pandemic year, remote East Hampton, more than 100 miles away from Manhattan, gained the most movers at 622. But the next year, from March 2021 to February 2022, it was Long Island City in Queens, gaining 960 new residents.

Moves out of New York affected the whole region, including nearby Connecticut, where suburban Fairfield gained the most movers in the pandemic’s first year, 715, a more than three-fold increase.

Terri Ann Lowenthal, a Connecticut-based census consultant, said she saw the effect in nearby Stamford, where in-moves also tripled in the first pandemic year near a commuter rail station. Both Fairfield and Stamford have relatively easy commuter train access to New York City.

“The neighborhood near the train station was overrun by New Yorkers escaping the city,” Lowenthal said. “A local developer was building luxury rental buildings faster than you can spell ‘Connecticut.’”

In Bend, Waterston said people now need a reservation for the famous South Sister volcano hike, the eastern desert known as Oregon’s Outback is getting busier with visitors, and waterways are filled with “thongs and Speedos and inflatable unicorns floating through town.” Signs of its past as a lumber mill and livestock auction town are disappearing, she said.

“Bend is hard for me to recognize,” Waterston said. “I am reacting the same way as many who are packing up and heading for a smaller town only to initiate the same problem.”

This story was originally published by Stateline News, a part of the Pew Charitable Trusts. It is reprinted here with permission. The original story can be found here.

'We hit the bullseye here': Snow bullseye targets East Hampton

East Hampton was just one of the eastern Connecticut towns blanketed by a fast-moving winter weather system Friday morning.EAST HAMPTON, Conn. — East Hampton was just one of the eastern Connecticut towns blanketed by a fast-moving winter weather system Friday morning, which dropped upwards of a foot of snow in some places.“Light and fluffy and easy to move”; that’s how Dan Peszynski described the round of snowfall that hit East Hampton. He's the owner of Paul and Sandy’s Too, the popular Country an...

East Hampton was just one of the eastern Connecticut towns blanketed by a fast-moving winter weather system Friday morning.

EAST HAMPTON, Conn. — East Hampton was just one of the eastern Connecticut towns blanketed by a fast-moving winter weather system Friday morning, which dropped upwards of a foot of snow in some places.

“Light and fluffy and easy to move”; that’s how Dan Peszynski described the round of snowfall that hit East Hampton. He's the owner of Paul and Sandy’s Too, the popular Country and Hardware Store famous for “Pumpkintown”.

Peszynski was able to christen his brand new plow and clear out the snow from the lot of his store where business began to pick up as the day went on.

“We hit the bullseye here, it’s got to be 12 plus inches of snow here,” Peszynski said, and then added, “We are a business here so we sell ice melt, the sleds and with the kids being off (from school) we’re selling sleds and things like that.”

A bit more west in Glastonbury, contractor Terry MacClain said he began his day moving snow out of client parking lots at around 5 a.m.

“It was real fluffy this morning. Now it's melting off a bit, it’s getting a bit wet and heavy,” MacClain said.

Across Main Street, Katz Ace Hardware was also busy selling winter essentials.

“They’ve been buying show shovels, ice melt, sleds – a lot of sleds this morning so far,” said manager Allie Campbell.

For Winter weather lovers, a snow day was welcomed.

“We finally got hit with some really good winter weather. It’s great, it’s fantastic,” Peszynski added.

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Masks optional for students, staff in East Hampton schools in fall

EAST HAMPTON — Students will be returning to the classroom full time at East Hampton Public Schools this fall and will not be required to wear masks.Superintendent Paul Smith shared the reopening plan on the district’s website, outlining everything from mask wearing, transportation, events, sports, and even locker usage.As fo...

EAST HAMPTON — Students will be returning to the classroom full time at East Hampton Public Schools this fall and will not be required to wear masks.

Superintendent Paul Smith shared the reopening plan on the district’s website, outlining everything from mask wearing, transportation, events, sports, and even locker usage.

As for facial coverings, students and staff can wear them but will not be required to, he said. The district recommends mask wearing for those the unvaccinated and during flu season, but the policy is not mandatory.

While COVID immunization will not be required for students, staff or parents, volunteers and guest speakers at East Hampton schools will need to show proof of vaccination before being able to enter the schools, he said.

Remote learning won’t be being offered for the 2021-22 school year, and neither will temporary homeschooling. “Families who wish to homeschool children will need to withdraw students from school,” according to the policy.

Desk shields will also not be used regularly in pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Lunch will also return to normal, and will be served in the cafeterias.

The only time learning via Google Meet will be allowed is when an unvaccinated student is quarantining, a student tests positive for the virus, unvaccinated students are awaiting coronavirus test results, and if a student has a medical condition or surgical procedure that prevents them from attending class. The last reason must be approved by the principal in advance, according to the plan.

Parents are encouraged to conduct morning health screenings, checking their child’s temperature to make sure it is below 100 degrees, and monitoring symptoms before bringing their child to school.

The district is also encouraging parents who drove their children to school for the 2020-21 academic year to send them on the bus next year, however masks will also not be required on school buses.

As far as preventative measures go, social distancing will be in place for unvaccinated members of the school community and will be done when possible for those who are vaccinated. There will also be hand sanitizer stations stationed around the schools.

Students will have access to lockers at the Central, middle and high schools, and will be able to place their backpacks in lockers. At Memorial School, students will have regular access to cubbies.

As for sports, the middle and high schools will continue to follow Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference guidance for fall, winter and spring athletics.

“The East Hampton Public Schools will not be more restrictive than any guidelines from the CIAC, except when student cases surge or participation puts East Hampton children in a position of elevated risk,” the plan reads.

Outdoor events, theater events and concerts can occur without people wearing masks or according to any limits on the number of people attending. After-school clubs will also resume in the fall.

These guidelines are subject to change depending on guidance issued by the governor, Connecticut State Department of Education, state Department of Public Health and Chatham Health District.

Plans will be revisited every six months.

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East Hampton cuts tax rate by .09 percent from original proposal

EAST HAMPTON — The town’s Board of Finance recently reduced the tax rate, lowering it from the projected $49.6 million budget that voters approved June 8.The department anticipated a rate increase of 1.48 mills, but a recent move by the Town Council allowed the community to take advant...

EAST HAMPTON — The town’s Board of Finance recently reduced the tax rate, lowering it from the projected $49.6 million budget that voters approved June 8.

The department anticipated a rate increase of 1.48 mills, but a recent move by the Town Council allowed the community to take advantage of decisions made in the state budget, according to a press release.

It was funded by grants and other revenue of $9 million, and property taxes, the amount of which was reduced to $40.6 million by the Board of Finance action, the news release said.

At the urging of some members of the council Monday, the finance board set the mill rate at 34.53, which is .09 lower than the published budget, an overall increase of 1.39, or just over 4 percent, the release said. There was no increase in the previous budget, which means the average increase was just about .69 over the last two years.

The education portion grew by just under 3 percent, and the town’s operation budget increased by about 3.7 percent, it said. An increase in the cost of debt service of approximately $419,000 of $3.6 million was related to debt for East Hampton High School and Town Hall projects.

An approximate $395,000 increase for the Capital Improvement Program was approved, and offset actions were taken during the 2020-21 year to reduce the funding needed, officials said. Last year, surplus funds from the previous fiscal year were redirected to the program rather than including that cost on people’s property tax bill.

The change is possible due to a decision made in the Connecticut legislature during preparation of the state’s budget for the upcoming year.

“The changes we made in the process this year paid off immediately, and our taxpayers will benefit,” Town Council Chairman Pete Brown said in a prepared statement.

A revised grant program to municipalities to provide services to state-owned property within their borders will provide additional revenue to the town in the amount of about $100,000, the release said. That change, and increase in revenue, was not decided upon until the final days of the state’s legislative session, and would not have been known to the town under the previous local budget preparation timeline, it continued.

In April, the council approved changes in the budget preparation process that delayed the final approval of the budget to early June, so leaders will have a better chance of knowing what the state budget contains before making a final decision locally, the release said.

East Hampton Town Board Votes Unanimously To Privatize Airport

The airport will be deactivated and close on Feb. 28 and reopen again on March 4 under a privatized, prior permission required framework.The airport will be deactivated and permanently closed on February 28 and will reopened as new, private-use facility on March 4. The date was chosen after discussions with the Federal Aviation Administration and a review of airport operations at the East Hampton Airport, officials said.The planned closure and opening will cause little disruption to aviation during the time period because the...

The airport will be deactivated and close on Feb. 28 and reopen again on March 4 under a privatized, prior permission required framework.

The airport will be deactivated and permanently closed on February 28 and will reopened as new, private-use facility on March 4. The date was chosen after discussions with the Federal Aviation Administration and a review of airport operations at the East Hampton Airport, officials said.

The planned closure and opening will cause little disruption to aviation during the time period because the dates are traditionally times when there has been low levels of flight activity, town officials said.

The new, private use airport will be subject to local control; the town plans to implement aprior permission required framework, meaning advanced permission will be required before an aircraft may use the private airport.

The PPR framework will initially mirror that of a public use airport, but "substantive restrictions" will be implemented prior to the 2022 season in conjunction with a data collection period, as per the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act.

"This framework provides the town with flexibility to control the use of the air navigation facilities to respond to the community's concerns while also allowing certain aeronautical uses to continue," the town said.

The town board said they believe obtaining flexibility is necessary to ensure quality of life from Wainscott to Montauk.

"We are embarking on an important step in the town's efforts to address aircraft noise, traffic, and other environmental and safety concerns in East Hampton. Operation of a private-use airport will enable us to review and analyze potential changes to airport operations and make adjustments to address long-held community concerns," said Town Supervisor Peter Van Scoyoc.

The town board plans to work with aviation counsel, consultants, stakeholders, and thecommunity to craft the PPR rules for the 2022 season.

Community members will have an opportunity to weigh in on the proposed PPR rules and related environmental studies before they are put in place at upcoming public meetings.

All written comments and proposals will be considered once the town boardhas issued its draft scoping outline, officials said.

Some PPR options being considered include noise-based permissions that would limit or eliminate "noisy" aircraft; aircraft-based permissions, such as limiting or eliminating jets, helicopters and/or seaplanes; operator-based permissions that would limit or nix commercial operations; curfews; and environment-based permissions, with restrictions on leaded fuel and incentives for electric aircraft, the town said.

The news of privatization sparked questions from elected officials and residents, with some saying they believed the airport should be closed permanently.

For years, public has sounded a rallying cry, saying that allowing the airport to continue operating as it has been is unacceptable, and that traffic volume, noise, environmental, and safety concerns must be addressed, officials said.

East Hampton Town gained the ability to adopt airport use restrictions, transition to a private airport, or even to close the airport altogether, with the Sept. 25, 2021, expiration of grant assurances, or agreements with the FAA. However, to ensure all the grant assurances were extinguished, the airport must close for a period of time.

A previous attempt by the town prior to the expiration of the grant assurances, to institute a curfew and other use restrictions, was overturned by the court in 2017.

The decision to close the East Hampton Airport and open the new private use airport as a publicly owned private facility comes at the end of a year-long public engagement process, with envisioning sessions designed to gather and disseminate information to the public; share essential facts related to conditions at the airport; facilitate discussion and consensus building on future plans for the airport, and to solicit and compile public input and alternatives for board consideration and review, the board said.

In 2021 the town board also held eight board work sessions with professional consultants on the airport; conducted four public listening workshops, which drew more than 300 participants; held one-on-one meetings with stakeholders and interest groups, and, during the 2021 summer season, conducted an airport user survey.

The board also commissioned and reviewed a number of in-depth studies and analyses on noise and operations, an economic study, an environmental study, and a zoning and planning review, by professional consultants.

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