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Home Care in East Berlin, CT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that's how it should be - a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren't able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today's world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in East Berlin, CT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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Home Care East Berlin, CT

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients' lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a "one size fits all" approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life's little moments - where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can't quite keep up with life's daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in East Berlin, CT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in East Berlin, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

 In-Home Care East Berlin, CT

Types of In-home Care in East Berlin, CT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

 Elderly Care East Berlin, CT

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming
 Senior Care East Berlin, CT

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Respite Care East Berlin, CT

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings
 Caregivers East Berlin, CT

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior's daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in East Berlin, CT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

Home Care East Berlin, CT
  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client's individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor's appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior's needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

 In-Home Care East Berlin, CT

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in East Berlin, CT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

 Elderly Care East Berlin, CT

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in East Berlin, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

 Senior Care East Berlin, CT

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran's Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in East Berlin,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in East Berlin, CT

$2M prize was Connecticut Lottery’s largest in May

Five people around the state won prizes of $1 million or more playing the Connecticut Lottery in May.The largest prize of the month went to an Oakville resident, who claimed a $2 million Powerball ticket. That ticket was claimed a few days after the initial Powerball drawing on May 9.Overall, 170 individuals won prizes of over $10,000 in the Connecticut Lottery last month.Here is the list of people who claimed prizes of $50,000 or mor...

Five people around the state won prizes of $1 million or more playing the Connecticut Lottery in May.

The largest prize of the month went to an Oakville resident, who claimed a $2 million Powerball ticket. That ticket was claimed a few days after the initial Powerball drawing on May 9.

Overall, 170 individuals won prizes of over $10,000 in the Connecticut Lottery last month.

Here is the list of people who claimed prizes of $50,000 or more in the month of May.

Robert Esposito, of North Branford; $50,000 on a FAST PLAY - 50TH ANNIVERSARY GOLD ticket sold at Cumberland Farms #4618 in North Branford.

Raymond Giordano, of Hamden; $252,454 on a FAST PLAY - $10 SUPER 7S PROGRESSIVE ticket sold at Henny Penny Mystic 25 in Mystic.

Maureen Barnes, of East Hartford; $150,000 on a POWERBALL ticket sold at Burnside Smoke Shop And Conven in East Hartford.

Chandrakant Ghetia, of Windsor Locks; $250,000 on a $250,000 Cashword 8 ticket sold at Clay Hill Package Store in Windsor Locks.

Bristol resident; $250,000 on a $250,000 Cashword 8 ticket sold at Daily Mart in Burlington.

Giuseppe Fiducia, of Berlin; $100,000 on a CASH5 ticket sold at Berlin Convenience & Deli in East Berlin.

New Canaan resident; $50,000 on a $50,000 Win It All ticket sold at Merritt Smoke Shop in Norwalk.

Patrick Crowley, of Enfield; $50,000 on a POWERBALL ticket sold at Four Corner Package Store in Enfield.

Edward Perry Jr, of Plainfield; $50,000 on a Royal Treasure ticket sold at Haris And Ayesha Food Mart in Plainfield.

Thomas Staton, of New Haven; $240,000 on a PLAY4 NIGHT ticket sold at Express Food Mart #A14 in New Haven.

Milford resident; $100,000 on a Royal Treasure ticket sold at Family Mart in Milford.

Jatin Mistry, of Glastonbury; $100,000 on a CASH5 ticket sold at Top Shelf Liquors in Kensington.

Jose Colon, of Bridgeport; $100,000 on a $100,000 Cashword 11 ticket sold at Sofias Grocery in Bridgeport.

Lillie Williams, of Bristol; $100,000 on a CASH5 ticket sold at Fas Mart #301 in Bristol.

Segundo Monzon, of Hartford; $50,000 on a Super Cashword 22 ticket sold at Friendly Food Mart in Hartford.

Victor Thomas, of Hamden; $88,888 on a Electric 7s ticket sold at The Wine Press in West Haven.

Mary Daniels Manning, of West Haven; $88,888 on a Electric 7s ticket sold at The Wine Press in West Haven.

Hs And Mt Revocable Living Trust, of Danbury; $1,000,000 on a POWERBALL ticket sold at Mill Plain Package Store in Danbury.

Ronald Jeannette, of Hamden; $100,000 on a CASH5 ticket sold at Sammy Package Store in North Haven.

Amede Leclair, of Westerly, R.I.; $50,000 on a $50,000 50th Anniversary ticket sold at Bestway Convenience in Pawcatuck.

Windsor resident; $50,000 on a Winter Winnings ticket sold at Deerfield Package in Windsor.

Dwayne Nelson, of Hartford; $200,000 on a Let It RIDE ticket sold at Troys Mobil Mart Car Wash in West Hartford.

Milford resident; $390,000 on a LUCKY FOR LIFE ticket sold at Sams Food Store in Milford.

Ansonia resident; $50,000 on a 5X The Money 15th Edition ticket sold at 7-Eleven Store #33206B in Meriden.

Oakville resident; $2,000,000 on a POWERBALL ticket sold at 7 Eleven Store #11491A in Oakville.

Lawrence Giglio, of Coventry; $100,000 on a Pinball Wizard XXVI ticket sold at S & O Petroleum LLC in Vernon.

Anthony Cofrancesco, of East Haven; $50,000 on a Scavenger Hunt Special Edition ticket sold at Sunoco I-95 in East Haven.

Edward Motyl, of Madison; $100,000 on a POWERBALL ticket sold at Henny Penny Madison 37 in Madison.

Andre Williams, of Norwalk; $100,000 on a CASH5 ticket sold at Omar Market in Bridgeport.

Alayna Benedetti, of Moosup; $50,000 on a Royal Treasure ticket sold at Central Village Store 126 in Moosup.

Norwalk resident; $1,004,172 on a LOTTO! ticket sold at Az Variety And Cigar in Norwalk.

New Haven resident; $50,000 on a PLAY4 NIGHT ticket sold at Cumberland Farms #4749 in Orange.

Donald Healey, of Vernon; $137,578 on a FAST PLAY - $5 MONEY VAULT PROGRESSIVE ticket sold at Ellington Road Runners in Ellington.

Enfield resident; $1,000,000 on a WIN UP TO $10,000 A MONTH FOR LIFE 2nd ED. ticket sold at Enfield Market in Enfield.

Enfield resident; $1,000,000 on a WIN UP TO $10,000 A MONTH FOR LIFE 2nd ED. ticket sold at Enfield Market in Enfield.

Young Joo Choe, of Stamford; $50,000 on a Super Cashword 22 ticket sold at Town Center Variety in Stamford.

Waterbury resident; $825,000 on a $1,000,000 Emeralds ticket sold at Handy Stop in Waterbury.

Hoa Pham, of Bridgeport; $50,005 on a CASH5 ticket sold at Cumberland Farms #4739 in Fairfield.

Thanh Pham, of Bridgeport; $50,005 on a CASH5 ticket sold at Cumberland Farms #4739 in Fairfield.

Anthony Quaranta Jr, of Fairfield; $50,000 on a Lucky Cash ticket sold at News Express in Fairfield.

The Connecticut Lottery publishes the list of prize winners of $10,000 or more on its website. According to its rules: “Winners cannot remain anonymous. The CT Lottery will consider a winner's name, city/town, and the prize amount a matter of public record, unless the winner produces a valid protective order or Address Confidentiality Program authorization card.”

While most winners claim prizes using their individual names, some winners come forward using other legal entities (i.e., trusts, business partnership) to claim their prizes - to better shield their identities. In those instances, the Lottery will promote the winner using that legal entity's name.

Chris Cares: Upcoming event raises awareness of Autism while honoring young man from Berlin

BERLIN, Conn. (WTNH) – Chris cares about hunger and poverty. “We built houses for Habitat for Humanity in the south end of Hartford,” says Rocco Labbadia, about a non-profit in his son’s name which is now highlighting developmental disabilities.An upcoming event will shine a light on autism.“Chris Cares” is an ever changing effort, going where the need is, year after year, in Chris Labbadia’s memory.Chris always cared.“Someone had left a wallet behind so he drove a t...

BERLIN, Conn. (WTNH) – Chris cares about hunger and poverty. “We built houses for Habitat for Humanity in the south end of Hartford,” says Rocco Labbadia, about a non-profit in his son’s name which is now highlighting developmental disabilities.

An upcoming event will shine a light on autism.

“Chris Cares” is an ever changing effort, going where the need is, year after year, in Chris Labbadia’s memory.

Chris always cared.

“Someone had left a wallet behind so he drove a town over to return it,” says Rocco, Chris’ Dad, remembering a tragic night in 2016. “He went a half hour out of his way then a quarter mile down the road, (had a ) one car accident, lost control, hit a tree and lost his life.”

“It really is a nightmare,” he continues. “You can grieve in any manner you wish, there’s no wrong or right way to do that….and then I think you almost become empowered in the fact that your son or daughter would want you to move forward and do something.”

So, the Labbadia’s formed a scholarship fund for a Berlin High School student.

Applicants write an essay about how their life mirrors what Chris believed in.

“Which was being loyal to your friends, passionate about what you do loving and caring of your family, accepting of all people and truly trying to be a good person,” says Rocco.

Inspired by a family member – the upcoming Chris Cares Golf Tournament will raise awareness about autism.

“And what it means to live when you’ve aged out of schooling,” adds Rocco.

The mission – which got the attention of Pats Nation – is to share Chris’s unique spirit, hosting events all about love and consideration.

“Ultimately the envelope that surrounds it is Chris cares for kindness,” says Rocco with emotion. “What’s so bad about pushing some kindness?”

There’s still room to attend the dinner after the golf tournament at Berlin’s Shuttle Meadow in July.

Click here for more information.

Berlin High School Quarter 3 Honor Roll (2021-2022)

Here's who made honor roll at Berlin High School this quarter.Grade 12 High HonorsSarah Al Mozani, Bailey Baclaski, Kylie Bacon, Kerstin Bauer, Saige Beatman, Morgan Biello, Isabella Blackwood, Abigail Caliandri, Zachary Cancellieri, John Cofrancesco, Devin Collins, Alethea Constantine, Nicholas Costardo, Ryan Cyr, Jonathan D'Amore, Salvatore Dastoli, Isabella DeFrancesco, Taylor Desmarais, Jocelyn DiMatteo, Garrett Fallon, Sophia Fazzina, Jacob Ferland, Samantha Ferrero, Benjamin Fisher, Carmelina Fusco, Jul...

Here's who made honor roll at Berlin High School this quarter.

Grade 12 High Honors

Sarah Al Mozani, Bailey Baclaski, Kylie Bacon, Kerstin Bauer, Saige Beatman, Morgan Biello, Isabella Blackwood, Abigail Caliandri, Zachary Cancellieri, John Cofrancesco, Devin Collins, Alethea Constantine, Nicholas Costardo, Ryan Cyr, Jonathan D'Amore, Salvatore Dastoli, Isabella DeFrancesco, Taylor Desmarais, Jocelyn DiMatteo, Garrett Fallon, Sophia Fazzina, Jacob Ferland, Samantha Ferrero, Benjamin Fisher, Carmelina Fusco, Juliana Garcia-Chinchilla, Nina Garofalo, Ryan Garrity, Jethro Grumo, Griffin Hilbie, Sean Hunt, Isabella Karam, Paul Kendrick, Kinza Khalid, Daniel Koops, Kristen Kozlowski, Daniel Lamoureux, Grace Lazzara, Lindsey Leary, Caitlyn Lennehan, Mantas Malinauskas, Juliana Mancini, Joseph Manzi, Laura Martin, Patrick Matassa, Lauren McBride, Clare McGeever, Mason Michaud, Kasey Ouellette, Jamie Palmese, Julia Paul, Carlisse Perales, Eryn Riggott, Brooke Roberti, Dakota Rymarzick, Olivia Salina, Jacob Smalley, Ryan Stec, Madison Symolon, Gwen Tighe, Victoria Turcotte, Gianna Uba, Michael Vignone, John Zibell, Emily Zieba

Grade 11 High Honors

Tamarah Al Mozani, Noah Arce-Caliskan, Taylor Bellizzi, Dylan Brockel, Joseph Burns, Eva Chmielewski, Kevin Corteville, Kevin Daley, Kelsey Day, Michael Deegan, Kailee DeMaio, Brianna DeMorais, Brielle Dumont, Elizabeth Dunn, Oksana Dyshuk, Lindsey Eckrote, Alexander Gabor, Meredith Gendreau, Julia Greenwood, Alivia Halkias, Andrew Helm, Lara Hodas, Brenna Howes, Talia Impelluso, Jayden Jakiel, Matthew Jamrozek, Claudia Jankovich, Grace Kelly, Isabella Kmita, Nicholas Koops, Emily Lamoureux, Michael Lanteri, Chloe Loehr, Katherine Lukens, Luke Maguder, Ian Malespini, Trista May, Bret Maynard, Reagan McGowan, Lorenzo Miele, Alex Miloszewski, Marissa Modifica, Lucia Morisse-Corsetti, Michael Motta, Olivia Motta, Laura Munch, Emma Nagel, Colby Nardelli, Alexandra Nawalaniec, Ethan Nelson, Sydney Nelson, McKensie Neumann, Alyssa O'Leary, Gabriella Pappa, Neil Patel, Ronit Patel, Kevin Paventi, Natalia Penkiewicz, Joshua Plaag, Alexa Prendergast, Mitchell Rivers, Kenna Roman, Matthew Ross, Ashley Rusch, Ethan Rusch, Katherine Skinner, Matthew Sliwka, Hanna Smola, Nathan Snyder, Madison Starace, Molly Szczesniak, William Turgeon, Jameson Urrunaga, David Wadstrup, Caitlin Watson, Jenna Wenzel, Morgan Wesoly, Donovan Yeung

Grade 10 High Honors

Jack Baclaski, Alexa Barbagallo, Gabriela Blanco, Ryan Brown, Elijah Burgos, Adriana Casella, Emily Collin, Kyle DeGroff, Bois Del, Jamison Evans, Alexa Fallon, Rose Fas, Glenn Fearn, Brandon Garrity, Angela Gross, Riley Hoops, Hiba Jebli, Adrian Karwowski, Paige Kemish, Julia Kielbowicz, Michael Kobus, Patrick Kot, Emma Lavoie, Madelyn Lazzara, Connor Lennehan, Connor Lindsay, Deanaize Mack, Cameron Malcarne, Jacob Marion, Ryan Markey, Ryan Matan, Bailey Michaud, Jacob Miller, Katherine Morris, Morgan Napolitano, Tara Neumann, Kaleigh Ouellette, Julia Palmese, Shohum Patel, Alexandra Pauley, Jessica Petit, Charles Pinchera, Alex Poloszczak, Maksymilian Poloszczak, Matthew Raynock, Kiersten Reardon, Adam Rice, Ella Rice, Brianna Robertson, Jack Salerno, Ian Saunders, Santino Sisti, Hannah Smith, Joslyn Smulski, Kayleigh Spencer, Logan Szczesniak, Kelsey Therrien, Sophia Tierney, Alyssa Wenzel, Ashton White, Whitney White, Addison Whiteside, Alliana Wicik, Mia Wilson, Isabella Yagmin, Elizabeth Yeske, Maya Zureiqi

Grade 9 High Honors

Nicole Akulin, Jaelyn An, Jayden Andrade, Brody Bannon, Gianna Barile, Anna Barnat, Joshua Beaudoin, Marissa Bellizzi, Karolina Carlone, Charlotte Carlson, Madelyn Carlson, Elizabeth Cugno, Sara Cugno, Daniel Cwieka, Zuzanna Dabek, Matthew Dalek, Lindsay Dempsey, Natalie Dempsey, Zoe DiMauro, Max Ding, Abby Doci, Samantha Dunn, Nicholas Ebrahimi, Julia Farrand, Andrew Feldman, Lanie Ferguson, Klaudia Fidyk, Isabella Fogarty, Lorenzo Gil, Nadia Goulet, Reni Guo, Anousha Hashim, Juliana Holliday, Haley Johnson, Avery Jortner, Natalia Kmita, Kaitlyn Kozlowski, Macie Krawciw, Sybella Landrie, Emily Laskowski, Fiona Li, Juniya Lighty, Nadia Malec, Anthony Manafort, Nicholas Manzi, Gabriel Matta, Madisen McBride, Dana Metcalf, Gianna Miele, Giuliana Miele, Victoria Molas, Victoria Mosur, Elyse Niemiec, John O'Brien, Benjamin Parisi, John Pease, Julia Pelc, Dominik Picur, John Platt, Amelia Powalka, Emma Radoncic, Grace Ramirez, Christian Riccitelli, Chloe Rollins, Madelynn Sadowski, Hiram Sepulveda, Conlan Simard, Kamryn Stepina, Addison Szczesniak, Katelyn Tierney, Zachary Ulan, Jatnna Vega, Victoria Vozvyshayeva, Luke Wadstrup, William Weber, Katherine Zibell

Grade 12 Honors

Shae Bannon, Kyle Carlone, Natalia Chorzepa, Isabella Cloutier, Rylee Cop, Gabriella Crossley, Gianmichael DiDomenico, Delaney Gooden, Madison Greene, Hailey Karas, Emily Kobus, Jake Legere, Zack Legere, Mollykate Maguder, Sean Malone, David Manafort, Noah Miller, Collin Nadeau, Donald Plummer, Dominic Radek, Zofia Sadlowska, Elysia Sekoll, Kyla Smulski, Tanner Sparks, Angelica Szczygla, Brighid Taylor, Kenneth Wadinger

Grade 11 Honors

Ryan Bird, Meghan Bresch, Ruth Brown Kirchner, Anna Butrimas, Sean Colello, Ethan Cooper, Domenic DeNardo, Ariana DiDomenico, Terrence Dornfried, Gavin Foster, Ian Franczak, Joshua Grimm, Gavin Holland, Luke Johnson, Paris Lange, Alex Machata, Olivia Marolda, Bryan Morris, Michael Palmeri, Jordan Pare, Ishani Patel, David Perkins, Adriano Rasmussen, Meghan Riedel, Sara Rogan, Kaya Rutkowski, Demetrius Samboy, Savanna Serafin, Mika Siemiatkoski, Alexzandra Spinali, Klaudia Szarwacki, Jonathan Talavera, Mason Toce, Owen Toussaint, Caleb Uliasz, Austin Vale da Serra, Landon Vieira, Nicolas Vignone, Daniel Welch, Hailey Wieczorek, Molly Williams, Olivia Wojtusik, Devin Young

Grade 10 Honors

Andreas Aichele, Katelyn Allen, Tyler Bergstrom, Jeremy Bourgeois, Gavin Carrubba, Evan Chant, Chelsea Contreras, Erika Damboise, Calvin DeLude, Matthew Gagliardi, Evan Gentile, Sara Guzzardi, Christina Huynh, Dylan Hyburg, Leah Jankowski, Rachel Karanda, Carly Lapointe, Toby Lavender, Noah Melnyk, Natalia Olszewska, Nicholas Parise, Natalia Pelc, Jayleen Rosario, Julia Salina, Lauren Schillo, Kairi Sinnott, Madison Stec, Jack Vocke, Matthew Zup

Grade 9 Honors

Michael Abayomi, Faithe Barkoski-LaPosta, Austin Boninsegna, Isabella Cannon, Grace Catalano, Zachary Catalano, Kiera Colello, Logan Dascher, Ava Desmarais, Aiden Dunphy, Phillip Dutremble, Justin Eckrote, Nathaniel Elmani, Jacob Fowler, Joseph Francalangia, Madeline Fusco, Michael Goode, Izabella Jamrozek, Olivia Jester, Brookelyn Johnson, Owen Krawciw, Noah Legnani, Raymond Martin, Thomas Morisse-Corsetti, Peyton Nadeau, Elora Naumann, Bella Perugini, Peter Poplawski, Cyrus Revenaugh, Kate Roberti, Natalee Rockhill, Ryan Scaranuzzo, Jonah Shackford, Samyra Shillingford, Daphne Smith, Jacob Soellner, Fletcher Steimer, Kamil Szok, Kayden Tirado, Adrian Uszynski, Amy Wall, Raeghan Watson, Max Weber, Chenyao Zhuo

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Connecticut State Focus: Location Plus

Officials in Connecticut are always fast to point out the geographic benefits of the Nutmeg State, just northeast of New York City and close to the major metropolitan areas of Boston and Providence. To them and many others, location is everything and a great reason while businesses should consider the state for their next economic development project or corporate relocation.Of course, there are other reasons as well. Connecticut has one of the most educated workforces in the nation, a vastly improved state business plan to draw compan...

Officials in Connecticut are always fast to point out the geographic benefits of the Nutmeg State, just northeast of New York City and close to the major metropolitan areas of Boston and Providence. To them and many others, location is everything and a great reason while businesses should consider the state for their next economic development project or corporate relocation.

Of course, there are other reasons as well. Connecticut has one of the most educated workforces in the nation, a vastly improved state business plan to draw companies to the state and a reputation for being home to some of the most accomplished companies in the nation.

Still officials across the state realize that they still have to make their case with many companies because of the state’s relatively high cost of living and higher taxes.

The Town of Berlin, CT: Center of the Northeast

The Town of Berlin sits at the geographic center of Connecticut with a new commuter rail station that links Springfield, MA, Hartford and New Haven with a connection to New York and Washington, DC. What’s more, it is only about 2.5 hours by car or truck to Boston and New York via major interstate highways.

Berlin is an industrial hub that has seen continuous growth in a number of sectors including construction, home health care, retail, restaurants, manufacturing of medical devices, hardware and aerospace. Assa Abloy, a hardware manufacturer that makes locks, hinges and door handles, has a significant presence in town, with close to four hundred employees.

The town has a sizable presence in the utilities sector with corporate offices for Eversource Energy, an electric and gas utility, and is home to the western New England Headquarters of Comcast.

Another source of recent growth are mixed-use projects. At least three such projects have been approved or are under construction presently. Once finished it will feature more than 350 apartments, and 50,000 square feet of commercial space that will result in $50 million in private investment. This growth in new apartments will allow young professionals to live and work in Berlin.

Berlin’s economy has changed over the years and includes firms that employ individuals who work hard every day using their heads, hearts and hands. The town now has more than 20,000 inhabitants, and as economic development director Chris Edge notes, Berlin is unique because people who grow up in Berlin, or move here later in life, never want to leave.

“Many businesses in Berlin are family-owned-and-run, making for a strong bond in the community,” stated Edge.

Steady growth is the goal and with the competitive nature of business attraction, the Town of Berlin has added levels of tax abatements that range in duration from three years to 10 years. These tax abatements are only available on buildings and projects new to the tax rolls, but the Berlin leadership sees these tax abatements as a tool to bring in new jobs, investment and excitement to the center of Connecticut.

With a perfect spot in the middle of the Northeast market, on highways and commuter rail, Berlin is a location you should check out!

Middletown, CT: Rebuilding the Riverfront

Middletown, CT has had a vision to reconnect its iconic New England downtown to its scenic riverfront along the Connecticut River. The city is moving on two major projects to connect the two and give access to the riverfront’s assets to all residents.

Middletown is the midway point between New York and Boston. It is in central Connecticut between Hartford and New Haven. Downtown Middletown has a mix of uses including retailers, restaurants, services, professional offices, and residential units. It has a catchment area of more than 30 miles according to cell phone tracking data. Middletown’s employers bring in more than 10,000 workers daily from a regional employment base of more than 800,000 residents living in a 10- to 15-mile radius around downtown.

The downtown project comprises three continuous lots totaling 3.5 acres overlooking the Connecticut River. They all sit in the city’s opportunity zone and are ready for development. Two lots of 1 acre and 1.5 acres are city-owned parking lots fully served by all utilities. The other 1-acre lot is privately held, and its owner is willing to partner with the city on redeveloping the site.

The parcels are in the heart of Middletown’s thriving downtown where visitors and residents enjoy more than 60 restaurants, dozens of retailers and entertainment venues. It is walkable to Wesleyan University with its more than 3,000 students, and downtown is home to major employers such as Middlesex Health hospital and the Community Health Center that, together, employ nearly 5,000 staff.

Each parcel has complete utilities that should be adequate to support the proposed development. Middletown has committed $20 million of bond funding to construct a new public parking garage, most likely at 222 Main Street to serve the public, police department and the new development.

Middletown’s opportunity zone offers developers a low-risk project due to the city’s extremely economically vibrant and historically iconic downtown, close affiliation with Wesleyan University and major employers including Pratt and Whitney, Middlesex Health, and the Community Health Center. This site can become the key connection between the city’s Urban Commercial Center and the future riverfront development, the planning for which is scheduled to be completed this summer.

The city is seeking a public-private partnership to construct an exceptional development that will bring people and business to downtown, provide places where people will live and work, and become a regional attraction. Middletown is looking for creative ideas for developing the site for mixed uses including housing, offices, shopping, and entertainment. The final project will provide the public with a place where it can gather and enjoy the river views and access to the new riverfront.

Middletown has always had a strong connection to its riverfront on the Connecticut River and is investing in it to connect it to downtown and make it more accessible to the public. The city started its riverfront development by investing $60 Million in decommissioning the city’s wastewater treatment facility that sits on seven acres of the riverfront. The city has engaged a consultant team in developing a master plan for the riverfront that will extend Harbor Park south along the river. The final plan is due later this spring.

The city and its consultant team have been engaging the public since August 2021 to develop a new vision and plan from the bottom up. To date we have touched more than 600 people who have said they want to live, “hang out”, walk, bike, dine and be entertained on the riverfront. Essentially, the public has told the city to connect the riverfront to Middletown’s vibrant and exciting downtown.

This project will completely transform Middletown’s riverfront and, by extension, its downtown. The funding sources will be some combination of public funding from federal, state and local governments and private investment.

So far, the city has secured a $2.6 million grant from the State Department of Economic and Community Development to remediate brownfield properties adjacent to the decommissioned treatment facility. It has also invested $300,000 from EPA for site assessments and $5 million in local funds for investigations and improvements.

In the end, these guiding principles will define Middletown’s new riverfront:

Considering Connecticut for your company’s relocation or expansion project? Check out all the latest news related to Connecticut economic development, corporate relocation, corporate expansion and site selection.

Wave of Connecticut schools ready to drop mask mandate

Even though Connecticut’s biggest school systems — Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Waterbury and Stamford — will still require face masks after Feb. 28, dozens of other school districts will let them become optional.While a handful including Bloomfield and Norwich won’t decide until next week, there was a vast wave of communities this week agreeing to abandon the mandate. Glastonbury, West Hartford, Newington, Southington, Vernon, Enfield, Farmington, Manchester, Canton and Suffield were among them.They...

Even though Connecticut’s biggest school systems — Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Waterbury and Stamford — will still require face masks after Feb. 28, dozens of other school districts will let them become optional.

While a handful including Bloomfield and Norwich won’t decide until next week, there was a vast wave of communities this week agreeing to abandon the mandate. Glastonbury, West Hartford, Newington, Southington, Vernon, Enfield, Farmington, Manchester, Canton and Suffield were among them.

They’ve declared students and staff may decide individually whether to wear masks starting March 1.

There has been mild pushback from mask advocates in a few towns, but nothing remotely like the organized, high-volume protests by anti-mandate parents and politicians over the past year.

With the statewide mandate expiring Feb. 28, each of the state’s nearly 170 municipal and regional school systems is deciding individually what to do after that.

The answer so far appears to be that mandatory masks in schools soon will be a thing of the past.

“The reality now is that the Department of Public Health has stated that in many places in Connecticut, it is the right time, and safe, to move away from mandatory masking,” West Hartford Superintendent Thomas Moore said in a statement to parents.

“With high vaccination numbers, and with cases plummeting in our schools ... as well as the immunity gained by so many having been exposed to omicron, March should be a time when West Hartford public schools can move to optional mask wearing,” he wrote.

Darien, Ridgefield, Greenwich and others this week cited similar reasons for reaching the same conclusion.

Some towns will wait until next week to decide, partly in order to weigh guidance issued late Friday by the state public health department. The guidance consists of two documents: a list of considerations for districts in deciding whether to keep masks and other COVID safety protocol and guidance “to assist with transitioning to a model for COVID-19 management that aligns with our state’s general public health approach to the routine management of respiratory viral diseases.”

Schools boards in Bloomfield and Norwich will decide the issue at meetings Feb. 24, and Norwalk — the sixth-biggest district in Connecticut — this week began surveying parents and staff to find out their preferences before it decides. East Windsor is also surveying parents.

Most districts, however, didn’t seek out public comment, and instead simply let their superintendents issue written announcements. Newington, Canton, Manchester and Farmington were among the ones that took that this approach this week.

Educators generally cited the state’s plunging COVID-19 infection rate and relatively high immunization rate along with a steep decrease in the number of cases in their own schools.

While they don’t publicly speak of it, education officials across the state have also been under relentless — occasionally vitriolic — pressure from parents’ groups demanding an end to what they portray as an infringement on rights as well as an actual harm to children.

Words like “tyranny” and “child abuse” are common at Unmask Our Kids CT rallies, and Gov. Ned Lamont is frequently portrayed as a monarch or dictator. Throughout the school year, that campaign has been increasingly directed at local school boards, occasionally forcing meetings to be abruptly ended.

“It’s not just the mask issue, but it’s one of them that seem to have created a level of incivility in public discourse where board members are feeling literally threatened,” said Patrice McCarthy, deputy director of the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education.

CABE is co-sponsoring a training workshop this year on “How to lead a public meeting during contentious times,” something McCarthy said it has never needed to do before.

“Some board members are getting threats through social media,” she said. “Social media can exacerbate the lack of civil discourse.”

On a Facebook page for Farmington mothers, several posters became upset late this week after hearing that a choral instructor had announced that chorus activities would still require face masks. But by Friday, the controversy appeared to be groundless: The school administration said masks would be optional for all school activities.

Only in the largest urban districts will masks still be required, and several of them plan to phase out the mandate later in March or April. All school districts have emphasized that they must adhere to federal regulations that still require masks for school buses and Head Start programs.

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