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Home Care in Andover, CT

They say that your golden years are the best years of your life. For most older Americans, that's how it should be - a time to relax, reflect, and live life in a familiar place. After all, senior citizens in the U.S. have worked tirelessly to build a better economy, serve their communities, and raise families.

However, as seniors grow older, sometimes they cannot live independently without someone by their side to provide care. Unfortunately, some older Americans aren't able to rely on their adult children for help. The reality in today's world is that family members do not have the skills or time to dedicate to caring for their parents. That's where Always Best Care Senior Services comes in.

Our in-home care services are for people who prefer to stay at home as they grow older but need ongoing care that family or friends cannot provide. More and more older adults prefer to live in the comforts or their home rather than in an assisted living community. Home care in Andover, CT is a safe, effective way to give your loved ones the care they need when they need it the most.

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Home Care Andover, CT

The Always Best Care Difference

Since 1996, Always Best Care has provided non-medical in-home care for seniors to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as they age. We are proud to have helped tens of thousands of seniors to maintain a higher level of dignity and respect. We focus on providing seniors with the highest level of home care available so that they may live happily and independently.

Unlike some senior care companies, we genuinely want to be included in our clients' lives. We believe that personalized care is always the better option over a "one size fits all" approach. To make sure our senior clients receive the best care possible, we pair them with compassionate caregivers who understand their unique needs.

The Always Best Care difference lies in life's little moments - where compassionate care and trustworthy experience come together to help seniors live a fruitful, healthy life. Whether you are an aging adult that can't quite keep up with life's daily tasks or the child of a senior who needs regular in-home care services in Andover, CT. Always Best Care is here to help.

How does In-home Senior Care in Andover, CT work?

Home is where the heart is. While that saying can sound a tad cliche, it's especially true for many seniors living in America. When given a choice, older adults most often prefer to grow older at home. An AARP study found that three out of four adults over the age of 50 want to stay in their homes and communities as they age. When you begin to think about why, it makes sense. Home offers a sense of security, comfort, and familiarity.

The truth is, as we age, we begin to rely on others for help. When a family is too busy or lives too far away to fulfill this role, in-home senior care is often the best solution. Home care services allow seniors to enjoy personal independence while also receiving trustworthy assistance from a trained caregiver.

At Always Best Care, we offer a comprehensive range of home care services to help seniors stay healthy while they get the help they need to remain independent. As your senior loved one ages, giving them the gift of senior care is one of the best ways to show your love, even if you live far away.

 In-Home Care Andover, CT

Types of In-home Care in Andover, CT

To give our senior clients the best care possible, we offer a full spectrum of in-home care services:

 Elderly Care Andover, CT

Personal Care Services

If your senior loved one has specific care needs, our personal care services are a great choice to consider. Personal care includes the standard caregiving duties associated with companion care and includes help with tasks such as dressing and grooming. Personal care can also help individuals with chronic conditions like diabetes or Parkinson's or Alzheimer's.

Common personal care services include assistance with:

  • Eating
  • Mobility Issues
  • Incontinence
  • Bathing
  • Dressing
  • Grooming
 Senior Care Andover, CT

Home Helper Services

Sometimes, seniors need helpful reminders to maintain a high quality of life at home. If you or your senior has trouble with everyday tasks like cooking, our home helper services will be very beneficial.

Common home helper care services include assistance with:

  • Medication Reminders
  • Meal Preparation
  • Pet Care
  • Prescription Refills
  • Morning Wake-Up
  • Walking
  • Reading

Respite Care Andover, CT

Companionship Services

Using this kind of care is a fantastic way to make life easier for you or your senior loved one. At Always Best Care, our talented caregivers often fill the role of a companion for seniors. That way, older adults can enjoy their favorite activities and hobbies while also receiving the care they need daily or weekly.

Common companionship services include:

  • Grocery Shopping
  • Transportation to Appointments
  • Nutritional Assistance
  • Conversation
  • Planning Outings
  • Completing Errands
  • Transportation to Community Events and Social Outings
 Caregivers Andover, CT

Respite Care Services

According to AARP, more than 53 million adults living in the U.S. provide care to someone over 50 years old. Unfortunately, these caregivers experience stress, exhaustion, and even depression. Our respite care services help family caregivers address urgent obligations, spend time with their children, and enjoy other activities. Perhaps more importantly, respite care gives family members time to recharge and regroup. Taking personal time to de-stress helps reduce the risks of caregiver burnout.

When it comes to non-medical home care, our goal is to become a valuable part of your senior's daily routine. That way, we may help give them the highest quality of life possible. We know that staying at home is important for your loved one, and we are here to help make sure that is possible. If you have been on the fence about non-medical home care, there has never been a better time than now to give your senior the care, assistance, and companionship they deserve.

Benefits of Home Care in Andover, CT

Always Best Care in-home services are for older adults who prefer to stay at home but need ongoing care that friends and family cannot provide. In-home care is a safe, effective way for seniors to age gracefully in a familiar place and live independent, non-institutionalized lives. The benefits of non-medical home care are numerous. Here are just a few reasons to consider senior care services from Always Best Care:

Home Care Andover, CT
  • Age in Place
    According to AARP, 9 out of 10 seniors prefer to age in place within the comfort of their own home. With in-home care, seniors have a way to stay at home, receive the care they need, and maintain a sense of independence, improving overall wellness.
  • Peace of Mind
    If you or a member of your family have assumed the role of caregiver for your senior loved one, you know how stressful the job can be. Between caregiver burnout and constant worry, being a family caregiver is hard. In-home care relieves your burden and gives you peace of mind knowing that your senior family member is in expert hands.
  • Socialization
    Unlike many senior care facilities where the staff and residents rotate frequently, seniors can foster new friendships and build bonds with their caregiver. Seniors who socialize on a regular basis are often happier, which fosters positivity and leads to increased wellbeing.
  • Personalized Care Plan
    No two seniors need the same kind of in-home care assistance. That is why each of our care plans are tailored to meet our client's individual needs. We offer plans that cover everything from light housekeeping to more involved duties like transportation to doctor's appointments. Our Care Coordinators will work closely with you to develop a personalized plan to ensure your senior's needs are exceeded.

Always Best Care offers a full array of care options for clients at all levels of health. With our trusted elderly care services, your loved one will receive the level of care necessary for them to enjoy the highest possible quality of life.

Aging in Place: The Preferred Choice for Most Seniors

While it's true that some seniors have complicated medical needs that prevent them from staying at home, aging in place is often the best arrangement for seniors and their families. With a trusted caregiver, seniors have the opportunity to live with a sense of dignity and do so as they see fit.

In-home care makes it possible for millions of seniors to age in place every year. Rather than moving to a unfamiliar assisted living community, seniors have the chance to stay at home where they feel the happiest and most comfortable.

 In-Home Care Andover, CT

Here are just a few of the reasons why older men and women prefer to age at home:

Comfort

How much does a senior's home truly mean to them?

A study published by the American Society on Aging found that more than half of seniors say their home's emotional value means more than how much their home is worth in monetary value. It stands to reason, that a senior's home is where they want to grow old. With the help of elderly care in Andover, CT, seniors don't have to age in a sterilized care facility. Instead, they can age gracefully in the place they want to be most: their home. In contrast, seniors who move to a long-term care facility must adapt to new environments, new people, and new systems that the facility implements. At this stage in life, this kind of drastic change can be more harmful than helpful.

Healthy Living

Institutional care facilities like nursing homes often put large groups of people together to live in one location. On any given day, dozens of staff members and caregivers run in and out of these facilities. Being around so many new people in a relatively small living environment can be dangerous for a seniors' health and wellbeing. When you consider that thousands of seniors passed away in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, opting for in-home care is often a safer, healthier choice for seniors. Aging in place has been shown to improve seniors' quality of life, which helps boost physical health and also helps insulate them from viral and bacterial risks found in elderly living facilities.

Independence

For many seniors, the ability to live independently with assistance from a caregiver is a priceless option. With in-home care, seniors experience a higher level of independence and freedom - much more so than in other settings like an assisted living community. When a senior has the chance to age in place, they get to live life on their own terms, inside the house that they helped make into a home. More independence means more control over their personal lives, too, which leads to increased levels of fulfillment, happiness, and personal gratification. Over time, these positive feelings can manifest into a healthier, longer life.

Cost and Convenience

More independence, a healthier life, and increased comfort are only a few benefits of aging in place. You have to take into consideration the role of cost and convenience. Simply put, it's usually easier to help seniors age in place than it is to move them into an institutional care facility. In-home care services from Always Best Care, for instance, can be less expensive than long-term solutions, which can cost upwards of six figures per year. To make matters worse, many residential care facilities are reluctant to accept long-term care insurance and other types of payment assistance.

 Elderly Care Andover, CT

With Always Best Care's home care services, seniors and their families have a greater level of control over their care plans. In-home care in Andover, CT gives seniors the chance to form a bond with a trusted caregiver and also receive unmatched care that is catered to their needs. In long-term care facilities, seniors and their loved ones have much less control over their care plan and have less of a say in who provides their care.

Affordable Care Plans

In-home care is a valuable resource that empowers seniors to age in place on their own terms. However, a big concern for many families and their loved ones is how much in-home care costs. If you're worried that in-home care is too expensive, you may be pleasantly surprised to learn that it is one of the most affordable senior care arrangements available.

Typically, hiring an Always Best Care in-home caregiver for a few hours a week is more affordable than sending your loved one to a long-term care facility. This is true even for seniors with more complex care needs.

At Always Best Care, we will work closely with you and your family to develop a Care Plan that not only meets your care needs, but your budget requirements, too. Once we discover the level of care that you or your senior need, we develop an in-home care plan that you can afford.

 Senior Care Andover, CT

In addition to our flexible care options, families should also consider the following resources to help offset potential home care costs:

  • Veteran's Benefits: Attendance and aid benefits through military service can cover a portion of the costs associated with in-home care for veterans and their spouses.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance: Many senior care services like in-home care are included in long-term care insurance options. Research different long-term care solutions to find a plan that provides coverage for senior care.
  • Private Insurance: Home care can be included as part of a senior's private insurance plan. Read over your loved one's insurance policy carefully or speak with their insurance provider to determine if in-home care is covered.
  • Life Insurance: Depending on the life insurance plan, you may be able to apply your policy toward long-term care. You may be able to use long-term-care coverage to help pay for in-home elderly care.

During your Care Plan consultation with Always Best Care, your Care Coordinator will speak with you about in-home care costs and what options there may be to help meet your budget needs.

Compassionate Care. Trusted Caregivers

When you or your senior loved one needs assistance managing daily tasks at home, finding a qualified caregiver can be challenging. It takes a special kind of person to provide reliable care for your senior loved one. However, a caregiver's role involves more than meal preparation and medication reminders. Many seniors rely on their caregivers for companionship, too.

Our companion care services give seniors the chance to socialize in a safe environment and engage in activities at home. These important efforts boost morale and provide much-needed relief from repetitive daily routines. A one-on-one, engaging conversation can sharpen seniors' minds and give them something in which to be excited.

At Always Best Care, we only hire care providers that we would trust to care for our own loved ones. Our senior caregivers in Andover,CT understand how important it is to listen and communicate with their seniors. A seemingly small interaction, like a short hug goodbye, can make a major difference in a senior's day. Instead of battling against feelings of isolation, seniors begin to look forward to seeing their caregiver each week.

Understanding the nuances of senior care is just one of the reasons why our care providers are so great at their job.

Unlike some senior care companies, our caregivers must undergo extensive training before they work for Always Best Care. In addition, our caregivers receive ongoing training throughout the year. This training ensures that their standard of care matches up to the high standards we've come to expect. During this training, they will brush up on their communication skills, safety awareness, and symptom spotting. That way, your loved one receives the highest level of non-medical home care from day one.

Taking the First Step with Always Best Care

The first step in getting quality in-home care starts with a personal consultation with an experienced Care Coordinator. This initial consultation is crucial for our team to learn more about you or your elderly loved one to discover the level of care required. Topics of this consultation typically include:

01

An assessment of your senior loved one

02

An in-depth discussion of the needs of your senior loved one to remain in their own home

03

Reviewing a detailed Care Plan that will meet your senior loved one's needs

Our caregivers are trained to spot changes that clients exhibit, like mental and physical decline. As your trusted senior care company, we will constantly assess and update your Care Plan to meet any new emotional, intellectual, physical, and emotional needs.

If you have never considered in-home care before, we understand that you and your family may have concerns about your Care Plan and its Care Coordinator. To help give you peace of mind, know that every team member and caregiver must undergo comprehensive training before being assigned to a Care Plan.

Latest News in Andover, CT

Massachusetts real estate transactions

ANDOVER39 Abbot St: Nasser Rafiee and Kathleen A. Pizzuti to Abraham and Rebecca Moniri, $2,200,000600 Brookside Dr Unit L: Jennifer L. Aronson to Carolin N. Oviedo-Matos, $159,90055 Lovejoy Rd: Thomas J. and Patricia J. Mullen to Brad B. and Emily Durkin, $750,000145 River Rd: JDS 145 NT and Glenna J. Smith to ARE MA Region 97 Hldg, $520,000Riverside Woods Condo Unit 3308: Pulte Hm Of New Eng LLC to L P Palumbo T and Lorraine P. Palumbo, $574,99512 Swan Ln Unit 12: Lisette M Mancini LT and Robert J....

ANDOVER

39 Abbot St: Nasser Rafiee and Kathleen A. Pizzuti to Abraham and Rebecca Moniri, $2,200,000

600 Brookside Dr Unit L: Jennifer L. Aronson to Carolin N. Oviedo-Matos, $159,900

55 Lovejoy Rd: Thomas J. and Patricia J. Mullen to Brad B. and Emily Durkin, $750,000

145 River Rd: JDS 145 NT and Glenna J. Smith to ARE MA Region 97 Hldg, $520,000

Riverside Woods Condo Unit 3308: Pulte Hm Of New Eng LLC to L P Palumbo T and Lorraine P. Palumbo, $574,995

12 Swan Ln Unit 12: Lisette M Mancini LT and Robert J. Mancini to Jun Gao, $1,250,000

5 Tally Ho Ln: Irene V Lattanzio LT and Irene V. Lattanzio to Brandon M. Zoss and Rebecca Moreau-Zoss, $1,400,000

17 Tiffany Ln: Peter D. and Ruth Galvin to Jason and Kaitlyn Sanchez, $791,000

40 Washington Ave: Roger J. Oshea to Craig A. Trask and Wendy I. Heise, $675,000

NORTH ANDOVER

197 Campbell Rd: Jerry J. Rice and Meghan M. Dowling to Lauren Ogorman, $975,000

58 Compass Pt Unit 58: Melinda R. and Colin H. Costello to Matthew R. Oblenes and Andrea J. Bushee, $665,326

8 Fernview Ave Unit 5: Alex G. Borisyuk to Danielle M. Mcfadries and Gregory J. Enos, $310,000

170 Kingston St Unit 170: Mcevoy NT and James A. Mcevoy to Amanda Espinal, $305,000

148 Main St Unit F342: L P Palumbo T and Lorraine P. Palumbo to Gjorgji Markovski and Mirjana M. Markovska, $315,000

12 Rosedale Ave: Terrence and Sandra Fox to Daniel J. and Kayla M. Serard, $766,000

795 Turnpike St Unit 202: John Guilfoil Prop Hldg to Bertrada Properties LLC, $413,000

795 Turnpike St Unit 203: John Guilfoil Prop Hldg to Bertrada Properties LLC, $413,000

795 Turnpike St Unit 204: John Guilfoil Prop Hldg to Bertrada Properties LLC, $413,000

795 Turnpike St Unit 201: John Guilfoil Prop Hldg to Bertrada Properties LLC, $413,000

NORTH READING

1 Belmont Ln: Matthew E. and Nancy Chabot to Marcus J. and Amy E. Ottaviano, $1,282,000

88 Central St: Snook T and Katharine C. Snook to Sean P. Valiente and Lauren E. Haley, $750,000

2 Edgewood Ter: Robin Sadowski to Casandra and William Bernardinelli, $465,000

220 Martins Lndg Unit 110: Nancy J. Oconnor to Maxine L. Macpherson, $461,000

240 Martins Lndg Unit 302: Pulte Hm Of New Eng LLC to Alice L. Carney, $449,025

34 Northridge Dr Unit 34: June E. Pottle to Robert and Joanne Batchelder, $500,000

15 Peter Rd: Lonano Prop Holdings LLC to Melissa K. and Christopher Wheeler, $950,000

BOXFORD

14 Elm St: Susan T. Peterson to Kate and Michael Duffield, $1,175,000

33 Glendale Rd: Tremblay Properties LLC to Caitlin Feeney, $950,000

DRACUT

46 Berube Ln: Berube Lane LLC to Corey and Valentina Dejesus, $690,000

1794 Bridge St Unit 9B: K&K Equipment Inc to Turkey&Pig Realty LLC, $150,000

1794 Bridge St Unit 9A: K&K Equipment Inc to Turkey&Pig Realty LLC, $150,000

14 Dallas Dr Unit 103: Roger P. Fournier to Summer Family LLC, $310,000

34 Fox Hill Ln Unit 34: Jeffrey J. Zwearcan to Robert B. and Mary-Elizabeth C. Bilodeau, $552,000

44 Joseph Ave Unit 44: Nicole Leblanc to Rachel Fernandes and Andrew Rogers, $385,000

21 Kensington St: Miriam A. Roark to Stephen Woodin, $370,000

816 Methuen St: Mccarthy Bros General Con to John S. and Sinat Kang, $655,000

84 Scott St: Bober FT and Cheryl L. Lheureux to Nicole Lheureux, $406,000

124 Tennis Plaza Rd Unit 17: Richard L. Lepine to Youhana W. Rofaiel, $290,000

GEORGETOWN

18 Linden Cir: Kendra E. Coulehan to Matthew S. and Samantha R. Burns, $490,000

39 Mohawk Cir: James L. Ogden to 41 Mohawk Circle CBC LLC, $70,000

41 Mohawk Cir: OPM Adventures LLC to 41 Mohawk Circle CBC LLC, $100,000

HAVERHILL

Brandy Brow Rd: PGVG LLC to Victoria Angers and James E. Young, $236,500

55 Brickett Hill Cir Unit 55: George N. Pelletier to Richard W. Dandurant and Carla R. Griffin, $390,000

3 Coffin Ave Unit 1: Wood William J Est and Irene H. Wood to River RT and Randall L. Bennett, $150,000

20 Crystal St: PGVG LLC to Zealand RT and James E. Young, $225,500

23-25 Davenport St: Ryan Santos to Michelle R. Laliberte and Angelique M. Talbot, $465,000

1 Dexter St: Debra Asadorian and Thomas George to Graceland Enterprise LLC, $285,000

592 Hilldale Ave: Samoisette Betty A Est and Mark A. Samoisette to Alfred K. and Letisher K. Korir, $440,000

42 Jackson St: Douglas G. Dawkins and Robert M. Pettengill to Allyson M. and Douglas G. Dawkins, $89,800

58 Jackson St Ext: Tat W. and Yok L. Chan to Hilda M. Perez-Lopez, $470,000

125 Kenoza Ave: Mazraany Construction LLC to Gardens On Kenoza LLC, $844,500

129 Kenoza Ave: Mazraany Construction LLC to Gardens On Kenoza LLC, $844,500

17 Kingsbury Ave: Ellen L. and John Fotino to Eric Anziani and Ninotchka T. Burgos, $590,000

9 Myles Standish Dr Unit 8: Jennifer Boisselle to David K. Puglia, $240,000

645 W Lowell Ave Unit 4: Sherry Venezia to Alyssa J. Brennan, $189,900

21 Wingate St Unit 304: Driscoll Ann E Est and Theresa D. Miller to SGS Holdings LLC, $250,000

LAWRENCE

77 Ames St: US Bank NA Tr to David O. Peguero, $293,000

88 Arlington St: Guillermo Franco to Yovanny P. Gomez and Francisca A. Rosa, $460,000

202 Broadway Unit 23: Estep Inc to Keury Santiago, $240,000

243 Bruce St: Rafael A. Vega to Rainier M. Bello-Pimentel and Rosa M. Ramos, $685,000

11-11A Exeter St: Samuel Faulkner to Carlos Jimenez, $534,500

158 High St Unit 158: Phung M. Tu to Nicholas Sandrino-Silva, $292,000

20 Marie Ln Unit 20: Edmundo Pineda-Cardoza to Karla V. Bonilla, $314,000

4 Monroe St: John P. and Ronald J. Bradley to Silezia Vieira and Cristiano C. Simoes, $440,000

6-8 Morton St: Antonio Sanchez to 6-8 Morton Street LLC, $380,000

2 Nightingale Ct: Stuart T. Schrier and Michael Larochelle to BCAD LLC, $102,555

3 Platt Ct Unit B: Samuel and Elizabeth Figueroa to Julio A. Menjivar-Ardon, $305,000

41 W Lowell St: Jose A. Flores-Mancia and Reina L. Landaverde to Papouchy Garcon and Jhessica Jean, $502,000

20-22 Wendell St: Maylin and Leonides Gomez to Edwin M. Brito, $615,000

METHUEN

3 Brandee Ln Unit 3: Cynthia J. Pitera to Ronald V. and Therese Missick, $345,000

312 Broadway: Richard D. Dooley to Milagros A. Bruno-Fana and Yismeily M. Leonardo, $602,000

38 Buswell Ave: Robert E. and Patricia M. Trudel to Shanna M. Stephenson, $556,000

38 Capitol St: Roberta A. Orourke to Jairon A. Garcia and J M. Feliz-Degarcia, $445,000

12 Ditson Pl: Godoy LLC to Yaneirys D. Coronado and Carlita Coronado-Deleon, $625,000

26 Falmouth St: Atkinson Kenneth A Est and Kenneth A. Atkinson to Nicholas and Lisa Maclauchlan, $440,000

8 Glenwood Ave: Oscarina Quinones to Daniela Tejada-Vasquez, $530,000

59 Hampshire St: Nicholas Daher to Mohammad Hossain, $780,000

7 Landing Dr Unit 7: Hentz FT and Karl L. Hentz to Jaad T. and Julie M. Chehab, $399,000

19 Oakcrest Cir: Property Possible Inc to Marcos Pacas, $525,000

123 Pleasant Valley St: Bich Pham and Kenny Trinh to Grace L. Namanda, $570,000

21 Sequoia Dr Unit 21: Thomas and Elizabeth Mcdermott to Nancy J. and Gary E. Rogers, $755,000

38 Sherwood Dr Unit 38: Joan Morana Zeuli LT and Joseph L. Morana to Gail Vozzella, $665,000

9 Somerset St: Cook Paul A Est and Lisa M. Wilson to John Brewer, $425,000

19 Somerset St: Remo G. Avellani to Steven J. Folley, $440,000

21 Union St: Phong Nguyen and Ngon T. Pham to Maria M. Deramirez and Jose R. Ramirez, $376,000

32 Washington St: Ellen Z. and Roger M. Sirois to Avery Griffin and Brandon Cawthron, $705,000

11 Woekel Ter: Hajjar Nancy C Est and Debra N. Gilbert to Ronald Rodriguez, $416,000

SALISBURY

233 Beach Rd Unit A1: Sandra Gibbons to Scott and Wendy Parker, $400,000

108 Bridge Rd: Brudac LLC to Our Neighbors Table Inc, $3,400,000

114 Bridge Rd: Brudac LLC to Our Neighbors Table Inc, $3,400,000

Forest Rd: Jane Palmer Bruce IRT and Gregory E. Palmer to Essex Cnty Grnbelt Assn, $35,000

54 Lafayette Rd: Leo P. Comeau to Kathleen L. and Stephen P. Holmes, $424,000

264 N End Blvd Unit B1: Freckle International LLC to Adrianna and Jeremy Wooden, $680,000

Andover Elementary School students' artwork shines in DC

When a group of Andover Elementary School students spent their art class in September drawing Connecticut-themed ornaments, it seemed like a regular activity. Had they looked more closely at what they were drawing on, though, they would have read where their ornament designs were eventually headed — the 2021 National Christmas Tree Lighting held on the Ellipse of the White House Thursday night.Twenty-four ornaments drawn by Andover students ranging from Grades 1 to 6 were sent to Washington to be featured on the White House&rsqu...

When a group of Andover Elementary School students spent their art class in September drawing Connecticut-themed ornaments, it seemed like a regular activity. Had they looked more closely at what they were drawing on, though, they would have read where their ornament designs were eventually headed — the 2021 National Christmas Tree Lighting held on the Ellipse of the White House Thursday night.

Twenty-four ornaments drawn by Andover students ranging from Grades 1 to 6 were sent to Washington to be featured on the White House’s Connecticut Christmas Tree for the Ornaments Across the USA program. The program decorates a small tree for each U.S. state, province and territory, and the decorated trees encircle the much larger National Christmas Tree.

Both the National Park Service and the state Department of Education coordinated the program, creating 3-D printed versions of the local ornament designs from the paper templates the Andover students drew.

Andover Superintendent Valerie Bruneau said that when she heard from the state in September that only one class from one school from each state would be chosen to decorate their state’s tree, she immediately got to work to ensure Andover was that district, employing an art class that spans multiple grade levels.

Once the state confirmed in September that Andover got the job designing the ornaments for the Connecticut tree, the hard part for Bruneau was keeping it a secret from students and their families until Thanksgiving when the National Park Service and its foundation updated their website, revealing the winning ornaments.

“Most of the kids didn’t figure out where their ornament was going until the week before Thanksgiving,” Bruneau said on Sunday. She added that one second-grader was able to figure it out and told their mother, but was not taken seriously.

“The mom came to my office in late October and said, ‘She’s so cute, she thinks her ornament is going to the White House,’ and I said, ‘close the door — it is,’” Bruneau recounted, swearing the mom to secrecy.

Bruneau, who traveled to Washington late last week to see the tree decorated, said it is located on the South Lawn of the White House alongside the other state trees, which surround the large National Christmas Tree. She added that one student’s ornament from each state also ended up on the tree inside the White House Visitors Center.

“When I went down there, I was just so proud,” Bruneau said. She added that the students who created the ornaments are also proud.

“This is not only a point of pride for them because they’re from Andover Elementary, but it’s a point of pride because they’re from a small town,” she said.

“With 158 school districts in Connecticut, Andover will probably never get this opportunity again, so these kids will know they have something no one else in Andover will have,” she added.

Several parents of the students also expressed their pride that their children’s school was chosen.

“It’s an honor that out of 169 towns, Andover is being recognized,” said Roberta Dougherty, whose son Jack, a sixth-grader, drew a preying mantis for his ornament design because they are the state insect.

She said Bruneau had teased her early on that something big was coming, and finally revealed what it was after Thanksgiving.

“It’s a great memory for him,” Dougherty added.

Erin Boris was excited that her two children, Nate and Hilary, were able to design ornaments for the White House.

“It’s really fantastic that our little elementary school was chosen,” she said, adding, “We never had any inkling that our students would be involved in something so big.”

Boris said Nate’s ornament design was the Connecticut flag, and Hilary drew a whale’s tail splashing out of the sea for her ornament.

“It’s great to see this recognition for the kids. We don’t often get these opportunities because we’re a smaller school,” said Steve Fuss, whose daughter Aria drew a scene of the state capital building for her ornament.

Fuss said he is planning a trip with his family to Washington so they can see the ornament in person.

Bruneau said that laminated paper copies of the ornaments will be displayed on a Christmas tree set up in a gazebo between the Andover Town Hall and the elementary school so that people in town can see what the ornaments look like.

“It’s fantastic for them,” she said.

Varying paths, common commitment: Supporters of the YDS Living Village

As the threat of climate change grows more urgent, Yale Divinity School is showing the world one way to confront it. Through the creation of a regenerative student housing complex, one that gives back to the environment more than it takes, YDS is daring the world to take action for a more flourishing future—and demonstrating it can be done.The project’s newest donors followed varying motivations and pathways to the Living Village, which will meet its energy and water needs through onsite sunshine and precipitation. But all...

As the threat of climate change grows more urgent, Yale Divinity School is showing the world one way to confront it. Through the creation of a regenerative student housing complex, one that gives back to the environment more than it takes, YDS is daring the world to take action for a more flourishing future—and demonstrating it can be done.

The project’s newest donors followed varying motivations and pathways to the Living Village, which will meet its energy and water needs through onsite sunshine and precipitation. But all of them expect the sustainable living-and-learning community to embody their hopes for the future. Philanthropists George and Carol Bauer, John Campbell, the Rev. Dr. Elizabeth (Beth) B. Johnson, and Dr. Dale Knobel give their support along with their high expectations for the undertaking: the largest residential living-building project in the education sector.

Meeting a need for leadership

George Bauer, a retired executive who serves on the YDS Dean’s Advisory Council, and his wife, Carol, a hospital chaplain who trains divinity students, were early donors to the Living Village. The couple recently made a second commitment to fund construction, bringing their total contribution to over $22 million.

Mr. Bauer says, “Both Carol and I are convinced the greatest need in the twenty-first century is leadership at all levels of our culture. The church is changing, and we know that in change you need leadership thinking. It’s hard to imagine a better place to put one’s resources than where leaders are being developed, especially in the kind of environment like what the Living Village will be.”

In addition to cultivating leadership, the project aims to uphold faith and ecology, relieve student debt, and promote inclusivity and community. The buildings will be constructed from environmentally friendly materials and fully self-sufficient, collecting and refining water and handling waste on-site while producing electricity from sunlight.

A visionary complex of regenerative buildings: Learn more about the Living Village

Mr. Bauer has been deeply engaged with the project since it was initially contemplated. “When we were first telling people about the Living Village, it was hard for people to get their heads around a dorm that would create energy and utilize only rainwater and the sun,” he admits. “Now, many people are on board with it, and Yale University has included the Living Village as part of its forward look at larger climate initiatives.”

Yale has incorporated the Divinity School’s Living Village in its Planetary Solutions (link is external) initiative, which aims to raise awareness of climate and biodiversity work across Yale and unlock novel solutions to the world’s climate threats. The Living Village is also a featured component of Yale’s new “For Humanity” fundraising campaign (link is external).

A chaplain at Norwalk Hospital, Carol Bauer cites a need for the Divinity School’s aspiring spiritual care-providers to interact with each other at a deeper level than what is possible in classrooms. Residing in community in the Living Village, she believes, will provide students with that deeper experience.

“YDS helps develop leaders with a theological understanding not only for congregations and non-profits but also for teaching and law and the professional world,” Mrs. Bauer says. “And now the Divinity School is building an international model for regenerative design in the effort to save the planet. Anything we can do to enhance that experience for students is a step in the right direction.”

Bedrock support: Learn about earlier gifts for the Living Village from Sam and Ann Croll, James Donnell, and Clyde Tuggle and Mary Streett.

The project will ultimately house 155 graduate students. Groundbreaking for Phase One, including housing for just over 50 students, is planned for the winter of 2023. The facility is expected to open in 2024.

Bringing people together

John Y. Campbell is the Morton L. and Carole S. Olshan Professor of Economics at Harvard and previously a trustee at Andover Newton Theological School (now Andover Newton Seminary at YDS). He chose to support the Living Village to celebrate Andover Newton’s arrival at YDS and to honor his family’s connections with Yale.

Campbell’s grandfather taught at YDS in the 1920s and ’30s, and his father was born in New Haven during that time. Campbell himself received his Ph.D. in Economics at Yale and met his wife there. He later became involved with Andover Newton through his local church. He says, “I was thrilled when Martin Copenhaver negotiated Andover Newton’s move to Yale. YDS has a very relevant mission, and the world needs people to carry it out.”

“Having witnessed the burden of outdated infrastructure on Andover Newton, combined with a desperate need in the world to create positive and inclusive communities, the Living Village project struck me as a very compelling way to bring graduate students together, and get ahead of the climate challenge,” Campbell says. “Christian traditions have often been about creating spaces that bring together people in worship, life, and work. To have a twenty-first century version of that idea is quite exciting.”

Faith-based ecology setting an example

More than just residents, Divinity students inhabiting the Living Village will directly participate in the buildings’ sustainable operations and serve as ambassadors and educators for the complex. The Village will have indoor and outdoor community spaces, including gardens, for student use.

Beth Johnson ’84 M.Div., a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council, believes strongly that the Bible calls on people to care for the Earth. “God provided the Earth to meet all our needs,” she says, “but we are to be stewards of the Earth and must never stop finding solutions to take care of it.”

The Rev. Dr. Johnson is ordained in the United Church of Christ and has a Ph.D. in psychology. She has served churches in Arizona, Connecticut, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Now mostly retired, she works with congregations in Arizona and Vermont.

“When I was at Yale, I loved the spaces where I was completely embraced by the building and all those books and could let my brain go to work, especially in the library at YDS. As I picture myself living in one of the new dorm rooms, it feels energizing,” she says. “The students will be helping the environment while getting a degree, walking between the new and the old architecture on campus. The YDS buildings are unique and beautiful and full of history and Living Village residents will be part of the past and the future. It’s inspiring and uplifting.”

Johnson also believes the project is a daring step for a divinity school. She says, “I would have expected this from a business school or a science program in ecology. It’s so interesting to me that it’s coming from a faith perspective. It shows how faith-based education can set an example in the environmental world.”

Encouraging collaboration and community

The Village will maximize opportunities for social interaction, with common kitchens and close spacing to engender natural and frequent conversation and communal activity. The interior and exterior spaces are designed to facilitate encounters and conversation between students, as well as faculty, staff, and visitors from across Yale and the community.

Dr. Dale T. Knobel ’71 B.A. knows the importance of community building on a college campus. Dr. Knobel served as President at Ohio’s Denison University and Texas’s Southwestern University and has been deeply involved with philanthropic organizations such as the Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, the Sherman Fairchild Foundation, and the Texas Methodist Foundation. He learned about the Living Village when YDS asked his advice for approaching national foundations and ultimately supported a gift to the Living Village effort through the Sherman Fairchild Foundation.

“The Fairchild Foundation board is motivated by environmental sustainability activities, and the Living Village has the promise of making YDS the most advanced and environmentally self-sustaining university or college campus in the country,” Knobel says. “If you organize buildings and spaces correctly you can facilitate the chance meetings of people, which is important on a college campus.”

A Yale College alum, Knobel continues, “Looking back to when I was at Yale, I recognize that the residential college system brought together students and faculty into engaging opportunities. In the Berkeley College dining hall, I would engage with senior professors regularly. It wasn’t until years later I realized I was having interesting conversations with giants in their field.”

The Living Village will capture this spirit with design aimed at maximizing social interactions and community-formation. Common spaces will have sizes and shapes conducive to students coming to know one another. For example, spaces between buildings will be limited to 100 feet, beyond which facial recognition becomes more difficult.

Reducing student debt, maximizing inclusivity

In January 2022, YDS announced the achievement of a major strategic goal: Beginning next fall, the School will cover all tuition costs for students with demonstrated need. The Living Village will also contribute to students’ financial well-being. By offering below-market rental rates, it will help reduce housing costs—a major factor in student indebtedness.

Greg Sterling, Yale Divinity Dean and Lillian Claus Professor of New Testament, says of the debt issue, “The Living Village is a powerful philanthropic statement by our donors. After all, philanthropy is the love of humankind. What better way to demonstrate this philanthropic love than by offering our students freedom from the burden of debt and by making their education more affordable?”

The theme of philanthropic love for all humanity and all life is also expressed in the design of the Living Village.

The Divinity School’s current campus is modeled after the University of Virginia quadrangle. It is Jeffersonian in its design and aesthetic—a nod to a past that, for all its merits, was not welcoming to all people, Sterling notes.

By contrast, the Living Village will feature a design that looks to the future and creates “a place where all feel and know they belong,” Sterling says.

“We are very grateful to all who are supporting the Living Village,” Sterling says, “and hope our example will encourage other institutions to build sustainably and to teach people about how we can interact with the planet and each other.”

To learn more about the project and giving opportunities, contact Barbara Sabia, Senior Director of Alumni Engagement and Development, at [email protected] (link sends e-mail).

Pressley Peters is an award-winning writer specializing in philanthropy and marketing. She is a graduate of Rhodes College and lives in Dallas, Texas.

City of Andover, state answer community questions about well water contamination

The city of Andover and the state of Minnesota are working toward bringing clean drinking water to residents inAndover’s Red Oaks neighborhood as early as next year.The community had plenty of questions about the initiative at a public meeting hosted over Zoom Thursday, Feb. 3.The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is recommending the city extend its municipal water system to the Red Oaks neighborhood to provide clean drinking water to residents currently using a private well. Gov. Tim Walz requested $12 million in...

The city of Andover and the state of Minnesota are working toward bringing clean drinking water to residents in

Andover’s Red Oaks neighborhood as early as next year.

The community had plenty of questions about the initiative at a public meeting hosted over Zoom Thursday, Feb. 3.

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency is recommending the city extend its municipal water system to the Red Oaks neighborhood to provide clean drinking water to residents currently using a private well. Gov. Tim Walz requested $12 million in a proposed bonding bill for the project.

The MPCA’s plan is to extend Andover’s municipal water line to the eastern portion of the Red Oaks neighborhood, where most of the contamination is focused. A new water main will be installed for properties that tested above the health guidance for 1,4-dixoane, a clear, water-soluble liquid that can cause adverse health effects when consumed.

The MPCA found traces of the substance in private wells within the Red Oaks neighborhood last year.

Since then, the state has provided affected residents with bottled water for drinking and cooking. The contaminant doesn’t pose any known health risks when absorbed into the skin, such as in a pool or a shower, health department officials say.

Who can hook up to the municipal water main?

Eligible residents who choose to hook up to the city’s water system will be able to do so at no cost. Residents in the mitigation area can hook up to the water main even if their wells tested below the threshold for 1,4-dioxane.

If a homeowner with a contaminated private well chooses to not hook up to the municipal line, the state will no longer provide those residents with bottled water, MPCA Assistant Commissioner Kirk Koudelka said.

Once hooked up to the new water main, paying water bills to the city is each residents’ responsibility.

“When you’re talking about the average price of water from the city, it’s a bargain when you look at the price of what it costs to analyze the water on a quarterly basis for contaminants or even on an annual basis for contaminants, because proper testing of a well will not only include [volatile organic compounds] but other contaminants of potential concern,” environmental research scientist Daniel Pena said.

What about those whose water hasn’t tested above the health risk limit?

Those in the monitoring area where 1,4-dioxane isn’t yet detected above the health risk level will continue to have their water tested at no cost.

“For those in the monitoring area, we will still keep an eye on, and if something were to occur, we would take action,” Koudelka said. “For instance, if a well were to show over the health-based values, or receive a well advisory, we would provide them bottled water.”

Once the water main project is complete, the state will no longer be testing wells in the mitigation area.

How can I sign up for well sampling if I’m outside the Red Oaks neighborhood?

Residents with private water wells should routinely test their wells for contamination, even if there’s isn’t known contamination nearby.

“It’s up to you to ensure your own water is safe when you own a private well,” David Jones, research scientist with the health department, said.

Private testing doesn’t typically test for 1,4-dioxane, Jones said.

But the state will continue to routinely test wells in the area for 1,4-dioxane and may extend testing to outside the neighborhood if necessary.

Can I safely consume produce from my garden?

The state health department is unsure if eating produce watered with contaminated water is safe for residents.

“Science is not complete on this, because we don’t know to what extent which types of plants will accumulate the 1,4-dioxane in the edible tissue,” Pena said.

Plants do absorb 1,4-dioxane and get rid of it through their leaves, Pena said.

“One thing worth noting is if your contaminant levels are below the risk limit, I would think that your vegetables are less likely to be a health concern,” Pena said.

Andover man falls in love with wife all over again

ANDOVER, Conn. — Lisa and Peter Marshall from Andover were watching an episode of the TV when Peter started pointing to the TV telling Lisa, his wife, they should do "that.""I said 'do you want to get married?' and he had this huge grin on his face and he said yes and I said are you asking me to marry you and he said yes he was smiling so big and he said it’s going to be a lot of work and that’s when I picked up my phone and started to record," explained Lisa.The moment bittersweet, you see...

ANDOVER, Conn. — Lisa and Peter Marshall from Andover were watching an episode of the TV when Peter started pointing to the TV telling Lisa, his wife, they should do "that."

"I said 'do you want to get married?' and he had this huge grin on his face and he said yes and I said are you asking me to marry you and he said yes he was smiling so big and he said it’s going to be a lot of work and that’s when I picked up my phone and started to record," explained Lisa.

The moment bittersweet, you see it wasn’t just any proposal, Lisa and Peter were already married. Peter was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s in 2018 at the age of 53 and eventually forgot they were married.

The couple wed again earlier this year.

“You know just holding his hand and just felt as though I was committing to him that I was here for the long-haul and you know that I was going to stick it out, I am going to ignore some of those chores that we think are so important and hold hands on the front porch because that dirt in the house is going to be there later but that hand I’m holding won’t,” said Lisa

Lisa created a Facebook blog to raise awareness and bring forward the impacts of the diseases on those who are diagnosed and those who are caregivers.

“I’ve created the space for people who are in the same situation as me caring for someone with some sort of dementia because they’re all similar places where they can go and feel safe,” said Lisa

According to Jennifer Labrie, a Member Specialist and Regional Program Coordinator with the Alzheimer’s Association of Connecticut more than 80,000 people are living with the disease and there are likely 142,000 caregivers in our state.

“Both locally and nationally we provided education and information and resources and programs to people who are affected,” said Labrie

They provide a 24 hours helpline along with many other programs for caregivers. Labrie explained no question is too small. The number is 1(800) 272-3900

This October there’s an Alzheimer’s walk-in in Hartford where Lisa’s team is one of the top fundraisers in the state and the nation.

“I think it’s both important for people who are in the Alzheimer’s community is the number one feel that I’m not experiencing this alone there’s other people walking through this journey with me so that sense of comfort in that sense of connection,” said Labrie.

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